Dewey Decimal System

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Dewey Decimal System

A numerical classification system of books employed by libraries.

The Dewey Decimal System, created by Melvil Dewey, is a reference system that classifies all subjects by number. The numbers in a particular grouping all refer to a designated general topic. For example, the numbers in the 340s concern topics of law. Each new number after the decimal point further subdivides the previous number and the subject it covers.

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Expansions of Dewey Decimal Classification relating to oriental, Islamic and Pakistani topics.
The instruction session, or activity, teaching the concept of Dewey Decimal Classification followed this.
The Dewey Decimal Classification is a difficult concept to teach, particularly when considering the old fashioned naming of some subject categories and their relevance or not to the lives of ordinary people.
In her 1954 article, "Some Multi-Plane Classification Schemes," she discussed the havoc wrought upon Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) and the Library of Congress Classification (LCC) schemes by the growth of knowledge over time.
The eighteen editions of the Dewey Decimal Classification.
The "Amherst Method": The origins of the Dewey Decimal Classification scheme.
Dewey Decimal classification, 22d edition; a study manual and number building guide.
The project described here operationalizes these theoretical openings by applying them to the Dewey Decimal Classification as both critique and and as techniques for change.
Existing literature has critiqued the most widely used classification in the world, the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), for its treatment of women, Puerto Ricans, Chinese and Japanese Americans, Mexican Americans, Jews, Native Americans, the developing world (including Africa, the Middle East, and Melanesia), gays, teenagers, senior citizens, people with disabilities, and alternative lifestyles.
Using the Dewey Decimal Classification as a subject hierarchy, the browse interface presented children with a "bookcase" containing ten bookshelves; each bookshelf corresponded to a Dewey classification with only the science and technology shelves available as search options.
In addition, the technology area in the Dewey Decimal Classification appears to be less structured than the science area, making some topics particularly difficult to find in the browsing interface of the Science Library Catalog.