Areopagite

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Areopagite

a member of the AREOPAGUS.

AREOPAGITE. A senator, or a judge of the Areopagus. Solon first established the Areopagites; although some say, they were established in the time of Cecrops, (Anno Mundi, 2553,) the year that Aaron, the brother of Moses, died; that Draco abolished the order, and Solon reestablished it. Demosthenes, in his harangue against Aristocrates, before the Areopagus, speaks of the founders of that tribunal as unknown. See Acts of the Apostles, xviii. 34.

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57) In his turn Dionysius the Areopagite wrote that the exemplars of everything preexist as a transcendent unity within the Cause and produce the essences of things.
The triadic Neoplatonist cosmology of an eternally remaining first principle (mone), a procession (proodos) thereof through the forms into their effects, and a return (epistrophe) of the effects through the forms to the first principle would be adopted by Dionysius the Areopagite throughout his theology, while expressing it in Christian terms.
Building on the cosmological insights of Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine, Dionysius the Areopagite, and Maximus the Confessor, the Irish-Carolingian scholar John Scottus Eriugena constructed a wideranging, theistic cosmology in his Periphyseon (subtitled On the Division of Nature).
Thomson, The Armenian Version of the Works Attributed to Dionysius the Areopagite, Louvain, 1987, CSCO 488,489, Scriptores Armeniaci 17, 18.
This work will surely prove to be a standard not only for those interested in the figures of Dionysius the Areopagite and John of Scythopolis, but for anyone wrestling with the numerous and diverse Christological claims made during the century after Chalcedon.
See the analysis of this problem in Heirmonk Alexander Golitzin, Et Introibo ad Altare Dei: On the Mystagogy of Dionysius the Areopagite and His Predecessors in the Eastern Christian Tradition (Thessalonika: Patriarchikon Idryma Paterikon Meleton, 1994), 21-41, 415-21.
35) See Dionysius the Areopagite, On the Divine Names and Mystical Theology, trans.
Dionysius the Areopagite and the Neoplatonist tradition; despoiling the Hellenes.
of Steubenville) and Dillon (Greek, Trinity College, Dublin) examine the philosophy of Dionysius the Areopagite, influenced by but clearly departed from Hellenic Platonists in his use of an ecclesiastical cosmos rather than the Platonic Timaean, among other distinctions.
John is perhaps better known as the earliest defender of the writings of Dionysius the Areopagite, which had only recently appeared.
For the concept of the prima Mens and its definition, reaching back to Saint Augustine and Dionysius the Areopagite, see Roulier, 227-30, passim.