Distributor

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Distributor

A wholesaler; an individual, corporation, or partnership buying goods in bulk quantities from a manufacturer at a price close to the cost of manufacturing them and reselling them at a higher price to other dealers, or to various retailers, but not directly to the general public.

See: merchant
References in periodicals archive ?
Brae, 42, now works with distributors such as Kansas City's Harvest Media Group and New York's Sumthing Distribution to distribute music to more than 9,000 U.
Remington Ammunition Distributor of the Year: Big Rock Sports
Chapter 2 - Analysis of the World Electronic Connector Market through the Distribution POP Channel POP as a Factor of Total Connector Sales Total World Connector Sales & POP Sales with Percent Change 2008-2013 2013 and 2018F Total World & POP Sales with 5-Year CAGR and POP as Percent of Total Sales 2008 Through 2013 Total World Sales and POP Sales with POP as Percent of Region, POP and Total Sales POP: Point of Purchase (Connector Manufacturer's Sales to Distributors World Distributor POP Connector Market by Region, 2012 and 2013 with Percent Change World Distributor POP Market Year-to-Year Growth 2008 - 2013 What Happened in 2013 by Region?
Federal Trade Commission, the key difference between legitimate MLM companies and so-called "pyramid" scams is on what basis distributors are compensated.
These protests may actually work to the benefit of consumers, as well as the distributors who recognize the situation as a marketing opportunity.
If pushed to the wall, Japanese distributors are not averse to taking (or threatening) legal action to enforce their actual or perceived rights.
Technology has made it possible for distributors to solve problems in ways not possible until recently.
Major distributors in the Domincan Republic sought help managing the credit and collections process from local banks.
This is especially true when dealing with brokerage houses, mutual-fund companies and other third-party distributors who demand custom services (and incentives) in return for access to their distribution network.
In essence, the FTC forced the company to transform itself from an alleged pyramid scheme, which depends mostly on hefty sign-up fees, to a legal multilevel marketing company, which relies on a network of distributors to sell legitimate products.
6416(a)(4) provides a special procedure that treats a "wholesale distributor" of gasoline, on which tax has been paid upstream, as the "person (and the only person) who paid such tax" when the wholesale distributor sells the gasoline to certain tax-exempt ultimate users.
Merely announcing to distributors that they have been selected for "partnership" is unlikely to produce results: distributors have heard such corporate propaganda before and will not be impressed.

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