Divine Right of Kings


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Divine Right of Kings

The authority of a monarch to rule a realm by virtue of birth.

The concept of the divine right of kings, as postulated by the patriarchal theory of government, was based upon the laws of God and nature. The king's power to rule was derived from his ancestors who, as monarchs, were appointed to serve by God. Regardless of mis-conduct, a king or his heir could not be forced to forfeit the right to the obedience of subjects or the right to succeed to the throne. This concept was formulated to dispel any possibility of papal and ecclesiastical claims to supremacy in secular as well as spiritual matters.

References in periodicals archive ?
Like the divine right of kings, it is an increasingly archaic mandate, imposed on an organic system capable of self-governance.
Islam effectively moved from a medieval system of religion and politics to what amounts to a latter-day version of the Divine Right of kings.
Indeed, James's success in imposing his theoretical position on the relation between common law and equity has been his most lasting influence on Anglo-American society, and has survived, mutatis mutandis, long after the demise of the divine right of kings.
As I understand it, the Protestant Reformation and John Knox's Kirk held for the first time that there was no divine right of kings and that it was the people's right to choose their church leaders.
Until we make the distinction between what Episcopal Bishop John Spong calls "Christendom" and true Catholicism, the perversions of absolute monarchy, like the divine right of kings to deflower virgins, will continue.
Well - he'll just ignore it and rule through the divine right of kings (or princes).
In the sixteenth century, various segments of the Church's own sons and daughters rose "in protest" against her: some against her belief that good works and not "faith alone" are required for salvation (Lutheranism); others against her belief in a God that seeks to save all men rather than one who destines some to eternal damnation (Calvinism); and others still against her rejection of the Absolute Divine Right of Kings, according to which a monarch is subject to no earthly authority and answers only to God (Anglicanism).
A growth in a theory of the divine right of kings led to arguments that there might be a right to rebellion against a tyrannical king.
Prime ministers and cabinets arrogantly believe they possess the divine right of kings.
Charles I believed in the Divine Right of Kings and tried to rule without Parliament which was dominated by the Puritans.
The regalia was re-created for Charles the Second, who went a bit more lightly on the divine right of kings bit, remembering, no doubt, what had befallen his father.
Nobody claims Queen Elizabeth II was born beneath a rainbow, for example, but she does hold her exalted position thanks to the doctrine of the Divine Right of Kings.