division

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division

(Act of dividing), noun allocation, allotment, apportionment, breaking, breakup, cleavage, cut, cutting, departmentalization, detachment, disaccord, disassociation, disbandment, disconnection, discord, disengagement, disharmony, disjunction, disjuncture, dispersal, dispersion, dissemination, disseverance, dissipation, dissociation, dissonance, distribution, disunion, disuniting, disunity, divisio, divorce, faction, noncooperation, opposition, parcelling, parting, partitio, partition, portioning, rationing, schism, scission, section, segmentation, segregation, sejunction, separation, severance, sharing, split, splitting, spread, sunderance, tearing, uncoupling, untying
Associated concepts: division of costs, division of damages, division of governmental powers, division of property, eqqitable division, final division and distribution, political subbivision

division

(Administrative unit), noun area, branch, cadre, canton, category, chapter, class, classification, district, group, grouping, province, region, ward, zone
See also: affiliate, alienation, allotment, apportionment, argument, article, assignment, bureau, capacity, chamber, chapter, class, classification, component, conflict, constituency, constituent, contention, decentralization, denomination, department, detail, dichotomy, difference, differentiation, disaccord, disagreement, disassociation, discord, discrimination, dispensation, dissension, distribution, equity, estrangement, faction, incompatibility, installment, kind, land, manner, member, moiety, offshoot, organ, part, place, plot, portion, province, ration, region, rubric, schism, segment, segregation, separation, severance, sphere, split, subdivision, subheading, territory, title, unit, variance

DIVISION, Eng. law. A particular and ascertained part of a county. In Lincolnshire, division means what riding does in Yorkshire.

References in classic literature ?
Acting upon this hint, I made the division thus: 'A good glass in the Bishop's hostel in the Devil's seat - forty-one degrees and thirteen minutes - northeast and by north - main branch seventh limb east side - shoot from the left eye of the death's-head - a bee-line from the tree through the shot fifty feet out.
Accordingly, the great fire-horse was "let out" from Flagstaff to Winslow, till a division superintendent protested.
The division of the upper clerks of staunch firms, or of the "steady old fellows," it was not possible to mistake.
Everything now marked out Louisa for Captain Wentworth; nothing could be plainer; and where many divisions were necessary, or even where they were not, they walked side by side nearly as much as the other two.
We are not English," said my companion, watching me helplessly while I threw open the shutters of one of the divisions of the wide high window.
The causes of atheism are: divisions in religion, if they be many; for any one main division, addeth zeal to both sides; but many divisions introduce atheism.
He reckons not the military a part before the increase of territory and joining to the borders of the neighbouring powers will make war necessary: and even amongst them who compose his four divisions, or whoever have any connection with each other, it will be necessary to have some one to distribute justice, and determine between man and man.
By this time the four divisions of De Montfort's army were in full view of the town.
All three came to open the offices and clean them, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; at which time they read the newspapers and talked civil service politics from their point of view with the servants of other divisions, exchanging the bureaucratic gossip.
The divisions of society have become too widely separated.
To give an example amongst insects, in one great division of the Hymenoptera, the antennae, as Westwood has remarked, are most constant in structure; in another division they differ much, and the differences are of quite subordinate value in classification; yet no one probably will say that the antennae in these two divisions of the same order are of unequal physiological importance.
The natural divisions are five in number;--( 1) Book I and the first half of Book II down to the paragraph beginning, "I had always admired the genius of Glaucon and Adeimantus," which is introductory; the first book containing a refutation of the popular and sophistical notions of justice, and concluding, like some of the earlier Dialogues, without arriving at any definite result.