doctrine

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Doctrine

A legal rule, tenet, theory, or principle. A political policy.

Examples of common legal doctrines include the clean hands doctrine, the doctrine of false demonstration, and the doctrine of merger.

The Monroe Doctrine, enunciated by President James Monroe on December 2, 1823, was an American policy to consider any aggression by a European country against any western hemisphere country to be a hostile act toward the United States.

doctrine

noun belief, canon, credendum, credo, creed, dogma, formulated belief, gospel, maxim, philosophy, precept, principle, professed belief, rule, system, system of belief, teaching, teachings, tenet, univerral principle
Associated concepts: added risk doctrine, avoidable conseeuences doctrine, beneficial consideration doctrine, collateral source doctrine, cy pres doctrine, de facto doctrine, doctrine of abstention, doctrine of assumed risk, doctrine of avoidable consequences, doctrine of last clear chance, doctrine of recrimination, doctrine of relation back, doccrine of res judicata, doctrine of subrogation, doctrine of the law of the case, doctrine of unclean hands, doctrine of unjust enrichment, emergency doctrine, exclusive connrol doctrine, exhaustion of remedies doctrine, humanitarran doctrine, imminent peril doctrine, last clear chance, main purpose doctrine, res ipsa loquitur doctrine, rescue doctrine
See also: belief, codification, concept, conviction, directive, discipline, dogma, idea, persuasion, platform, policy, precept, prescription, principle, rule, theory, thesis
References in classic literature ?
The doctrines of Plato are necessarily different at different times of his life, as new distinctions are realized, or new stages of thought attained by him.
Through Piers and his search for Truth is developed the great central teaching of the poem, the Gospel of Work--the doctrine, namely, that society is to be saved by honest labor, or in general by the faithful service of every class in its own sphere.
The documents too from which the doctrine is to be drawn, charmed my fancy by their endless variety, and lay always before me, even in sleep; for they are the tools in our hands, the bread in our basket, the transactions of the street, the farm and the dwelling-house; greetings, relations, debts and credits, the influence of character, the nature and endowment of all men.
The supply of adult women was running short, and polygamy without a female population on which to draw was a barren doctrine indeed.
Doctrine or no doctrine," said the sturdy woodsman, "'tis the belief of knaves, and the curse of an honest man.
We have had a very pleasant time of it here," he said, giving up as inexplicable the relevance of the doctrine of necessity.
We have heard of the impious doctrine in the Old World, that the people were made for kings, not kings for the people.
As to the doctrine of the Circles it may briefly be summed up in a single maxim, "Attend to your Configuration.
Monsieur," said Conrart, "you yourself are in the wrong persisting in decorating yourself with the name of an Epicurean; indeed, nothing here reminds me of the doctrine of the philosopher of Gargetta.
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
The ancient Persian doctrine of an incessant warfare
How far she developed and illustrated that conscienceless and austere doctrine to the girl- friends, who were mere transient shadows to her husband, I could not tell.