dogma

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Related to Dogmatists: dogmatism, Empiricists

dogma

noun article of faith, axiom, belief, canon, conviction, credendum, credo, creed, declaration of faith, dictum, doctrinaire opinion, doctrine, dogma, doxy, maxim, orthodoxy, persuasion, placitum, precept, professed belief, rule, tenet
See also: article, belief, conviction, doctrine, idea, persuasion, precept, principle, rule, theory, thesis

DOGMA, civil law. This word is used in the first chapter, first section, of the second Novel, and signifies an ordinance of the senate. See also Dig. 27, 1, 6.

References in periodicals archive ?
Scepticism successfully humiliates the proud reason of dogmatists by unmasking their characteristic utterances as ungrounded protests, possibly made in bad faith.
37) In this passage the Dogmatists Sextus is referring to are the Stoics.
I confess that I find Popper's epistemology more convincing than either the verificationists and conventionalists, on the one hand, or the dogmatists, on the other hand.
Finally, it is observed that this stow of dogmatists versus sceptics corresponds to Kant's conception of his predecessors.
The idea of an "absolute and invincible rationality," as he puts it, is one treated more amicably by dogmatists than by the humanists he accuses of cherishing it.
My next point of contrast between Descartes and the skeptical tradition, or better, my next two points, or next point and a corollary, concern the skeptics' opposition to dogmatists and dogmatism.
Those who copy Fido must be dogmatists, categorists, absolutists, "know-alls".
of reason has not been carried out, most men will be dogmatists.
Sextus goes on in the same chapter to say that even if he does bring logoi against the phenomena, it is only to exhibit the rashness of the dogmatists by showing how deceptive the logos can be.
91) According to Fichte, the methodological attitude of the Kantian transcendental critic is open to both dogmatists and idealists (although only idealists will be able to follow through on it consistently).
This recognition appears in Hatherley's frank admiration for the "superb mini-city" (221) of Leicester University, a near-elegiac description of Edinburgh, and a fulsome appreciation of post-blitz Coventry: "The real dogmatists are those who would dismiss the city simply because it (was) new.
Should we be a party of brilliant dogmatists, argufiers, and protesters, or are we meant to be trying to be a party of government?