due care

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due care

n. the conduct that a reasonable man or woman will exercise in a particular situation, in looking out for the safety of others. If one uses due care then an injured party cannot prove negligence. This is one of those nebulous standards by which negligence is tested. Each juror has to determine what a "reasonable" man or woman would do.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the context of IPOs, due diligence is a process adopted by issuers of securities to determine whether they have properly prepared their prospectus.
Investment Management Due Diligence Association (IMDDA) is an organization singularly focused on both investment management and operational due diligence.
Along with greater risk protection, an appropriate level of equity due diligence can save investors money by providing information that they can use to negotiate the final purchase price.
Increasingly, enforcement authorities recognize the importance of conducting adequate due diligence on third parties, regardless of industry.
It is also important that any due diligence be planned, structured and focused on the key elements; otherwise the process can drift, wasting time, money and resources, and even worse a missed opportunity or a bad acquisition.
Simply defined as an investor's analysis of a potential investment opportunity, due diligence is a concept that has found widespread acceptance.
Many sellers will conduct due diligence on their own practices in advance of a sale, including reviewing contracts to determine if they are assignable, financial records to ensure there are no conditions that a buyer will find undesirable, the malpractice or employee claims history, and that all policies and procedures are in accordance with laws and standards of practice.
The opportunity for buyers is to use better-quality due diligence information to identify and prioritize their "hot" issues and address them in the purchase agreement.
American companies active abroad typically have developed systems for due diligence, but not all have consistently applied them to third parties retained for a tax and customs-related function, particularly if those third parties are professional services firms.
In addition, being a public company facilitates the initial purchasers' due diligence, since the company will already be in the habit of accommodating the due diligence needs of underwriters and the information requests of investors and securities analysts.
To those wishing to invest in skilled nursing properties, the smart money is on these two words of advice: due diligence.