embellishment

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He will report what he has seen to Huntingdon and all the rest, with such embellishments as he thinks proper.
That our work, therefore, might be in no danger of being likened to the labours of these historians, we have taken every occasion of interspersing through the whole sundry similes, descriptions, and other kind of poetical embellishments.
Greatcoats, riding- whips, bridles, top-boots, spurs, and such gear, were strewn about on all sides, and formed, with some huge stags' antlers, and a few portraits of dogs and horses, its principal embellishments.
poetry makes life what light and music do the stage-- strip the one of the false embellishments, and the other of its illusions, and what is there real in either to live or care for?
See," he added, pointing to a place where the water trickled from a rock, forming a little crystal spring, before it found an issue through the adjacent crevices; "you may easily get rid of the Sagamore's daub, and when you come back I will try my hand at a new embellishment.
We have been hearing about your adventure, Tom, with a handsome lie added for embellishment.
When you talked about notching ears and slitting noses I judged that that was your own embellishment, because white men don't take that sort of revenge.
She gazed concernedly at the dusky fingers she held in her own, and also at her dress; which she feared had gained no embellishment from its contact with his.
Tellson's (they said) wanted no elbow-room, Tellson's wanted no light, Tellson's wanted no embellishment.
The chisel had made three or four of these attempts at embellishment over his nose, but had given them up without an effort to smooth them off.
Those in whom the faculty of reason is predominant, and who most skillfully dispose their thoughts with a view to render them clear and intelligible, are always the best able to persuade others of the truth of what they lay down, though they should speak only in the language of Lower Brittany, and be wholly ignorant of the rules of rhetoric; and those whose minds are stored with the most agreeable fancies, and who can give expression to them with the greatest embellishment and harmony, are still the best poets, though unacquainted with the art of poetry.
Phidias was supposed to have stolen some public gold, with the connivance of Pericles, for the embellishment of the statue of Minerva.