Enfeoffment


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Enfeoffment

Also known as feoffment. Complete surrender and transfer of all land ownership rights from one person to another. In old English Law, an enfeoffment was a transfer of property by which the new owner was given both the right to sell the land and the right to pass it on to heirs, evidenced by livery of seisin, a ceremony for transferring the possession of real property from one individual to another.

See: alienation
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to Alice, John Layston transferred the property to Fanshawe through enfeoffment, a very public form of sale that required witnesses.
According to a report drawn up by the latter two, Taube and Kruse announced that Ivan the Terrible was not going to tolerate the presence of Swedes and Poles in Livonia, and to avoid the ensuing bloodshed the Tsar was proposing the enfeoffment of the Tartu Bishopric to Magnus, the Danish Crown designated as the beneficiary after Magnus' death; the Duke would also be granted possession of other territories conquered by Russians, over which the Tsar would retain his hereditary rights and the prerogative to offer protection.
15) Similarly, the idea that enfeoffment of property might be a question for a bishop would have been quite laughable; lands of the realm were the province of the king.