court of equity

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court of equity

n. originally in English common law and in several states there were separate courts (often called chancery courts) which handled lawsuits and petitions requesting remedies other than damages, such as writs, injunctions, and specific performance. Gradually the courts of equity have merged with courts of law. Federal bankruptcy courts are the one example of courts which operate as courts of equity. (See: equity, chancery, court of law)

References in periodicals archive ?
The merger of law and equity courts brought about the
First, although equity courts historically lacked statutory authorization to award punitive damages, (1) the distinction between law and equity no longer exists in Florida and does not provide a cogent basis for denying punitive relief.
The focus in both chapters is affected by the source material examined (largely the equity court petitions,) and McIntosh seems particularly concerned here to discuss new areas rather than to summarize existing scholarship.
2d at 886 (equity court may award punitive damages as a result of merger of law and equity courts, expressly overruling Dunkel and providing comprehensive rationale for rejecting traditional rule).
322) By using adequacy rhetoric, equity courts sought to avoid at least the appearance of intruding into matters delegated to the law courts.
By examining 146 acts of violence involving sacred people or sacred spaces drawn from the equity courts and the patent rolls from the fourteenth-to the early sixteenth-centuries, this study hopes to emphasize the variety of sentiment existing in England prior to the Reformation.
Despite the many virtues of Clark's pioneering work, historians of women have long yearned for an updated version that would take account of methodologies and archival sources that were unknown or unavailable to Clark, such as the records of the ecclesiastical and equity courts.
Phillips, and a discussion of women's knowledge of common law and equity courts in late medieval England (Emma Hawkes).
Was this intended to prevent the equity courts from making appointments?
The power of equity courts had long rested on their
McIntosh enlarges our view of the categories of women's work to include taking in boarders, caring for the sick and aged, extending credit, or acting as consumers by incorporating evidence from the equity courts to elucidate aspects of women's income-producing activities often overlooked in earlier works, which have concentrated on occupational categories such as alewife, prostitute, or nun.
But manufacturers only rarely made use of equity courts, the venue for the adjudication of such civil matters.