European Convention on Human Rights

(redirected from European Convention of Human Rights)

European Convention on Human Rights

more fully, the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, a charter designed to further the goals of the EUROPEAN COUNCIL. Its members accept that citizens should enjoy human rights. Civil and political freedoms are enumerated: the right to life; freedom from torture or inhuman treatment; freedom from slavery and forced labour; the right to liberty and freedom from detention save in accord with the law; the right to fair administration of justice; respect for privacy and the family; the right to peaceful assembly; the right not to be discriminated against. Over the years protocols have added new rights: the protection of property; a parent's right to choose education; a right to free elections; liberty from prison for inability to meet a contract; free movement; the right not to be expelled from one's natural home. Many of the rights are subject to provisos on the basis of public order, public security and the need to guard the freedom of others. The Convention is upheld in the EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS. The law applies in the UK as a result of the Scotland Act 1998 and the Human Rights Act 1998. The UK courts maybe approached directly for reparation for infringement of their human rights by a public authority as defined. Courts and other public bodies must take account of convention rights in their work. See HUMAN RIGHTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2009 a group of 65 Belgian sportsmen and women cited Article 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights in bringing a case against the government of Flanders, the region in the north of the country.
The Conservatives have pledged to secure the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and British expats in Europe, as well as confirming Britain will remain part of the European Convention of Human Rights for the next Parliament.
The First Minister also spoke about the importance of the protections granted by the European Convention of Human Rights and the Human Rights Act, and how the Scottish Government will ensure human rights protections are retained in Scotland.
The European court, noting that 38-year-old Lambert had been declared in a minimally conscious state and last year deemed vegetative, ruled that French law was sufficiently clear and there was no infringement of the Article 2 clause on the right to life in the European Convention of Human Rights.
UK and Ireland have worked together to promote human rights and during the original case, the UK did not contest a breach of European Convention of Human rights took place.
The court in Strasbourg said Turkey had violated Article 3 of the European Convention of Human Rights which prohibits "inhuman or degrading treatment", over his conditions up until 2009.
It is incomprehensible for the EU to demand from Macedonia and Serbia to limit the freedom of movement for part of its citizens even though this presents breach of the European Convention of Human Rights.
Only the Greek colonels have ever repudiated the European Convention of Human Rights.
The European Court of Human Rights ruled (on May 20 2010) that this blanket disenfranchisement is contrary to the European Convention of Human Rights.
Christopher Coltart, representing some of the victims' families, told yesterday's preinquest hearing that the inquests should investigate whether the state had breached its obligation under the European Convention of Human Rights to protect its citizens.
The court said, in the case, Turkey did not violate Article 8 and Article 14 of the European Convention of Human Rights on private and family life and discrimination.
The European Convention of Human Rights was adopted in Rome on November 4th 1950 by the European Council.
Full browser ?