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References in classic literature ?
He used to get them from the public pound at two and a half apiece, and every time one died he had another ready and waiting.
Then the old man told the Irishman to mount, and to remember to throw a quarter of beef to her every time she looked round.
I felt, in bending my head toward you, your beautiful hair touch my cheek; and every time that it touched me I trembled from head to foot.
All this time he was shivering with cold; and every time he raised his hand to the knocker, the wind took the dressing-gown in a most unpleasant manner.
This continued, but every time the hand lifted, the hair lifted under it.
This was the thought that met him every time he tried to persuade himself that what Claire had said was ridiculous, the mere parting shaft of an angry woman.
And the soldier broke a branch from each; and every time there was a loud noise, which made the youngest sister tremble with fear; but the eldest still said, it was only the princes, who were crying for joy.
This time he did not trouble himself to make excuses as before, and his letters were less frequent, and shorter and less affectionate, especially after the first few weeks: they came slower and slower, and more terse and careless every time.
In our little town, which is a sample of many, life is as interesting, as pathetic, as joyous as ever it was; no group of weavers was better to look at or think about than the rivulet of winsome girls that overruns our streets every time the sluice is raised, the comedy of summer evenings and winter firesides is played with the old zest and every window-blind is the curtain of a romance.
He flushed, and stammered, "That's right, and I only wish you'd correct me every time.
Indeed, every time George and I looked round at him he was sure to be performing this feat.
Maimie could also see the pompous doctor feeling the Duke's heart and hear him give utterance to his parrot cry, and she was particularly sorry for the Cupids, who stood in their fools' caps in obscure places and, every time they heard that "Cold, quite cold," bowed their disgraced little heads.