Canal

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Related to External ear canal: External Auditory Meatus, External acoustic meatus

CANAL. A trench dug for leading water in a particular direction, and confining it.
     2. Public canals are generally protected by the law which authorizes their being made. Various points have arisen under numerous laws authorizing the construction of canals, which have been decided in cases reported in 1 Yeates, 430; 1 Binn. 70; 1 Pennsyl. 462; 2 Pennsyl. 517; 7 Mass. 169; 1 Sumu. 46; 20 Johns. 103, 735; 2 Johns. 283; 7 John. Ch. 315; 1 Wend. 474; 5 Wend. 166; 8 Wend. 469; 4 Wend. 667; 6 Cowen, 698; 7 Cowen, 526 4 Hamm. 253; 5 Hamm. 141, 391; 6 Hamm. 126; 1 N. H. Rep. 339; See River.

References in periodicals archive ?
The external ear canal was almost entirely occluded by a neoplasm measuring up to 1.
7) To the best of our knowledge, no case involving the external ear canal (EAC) has been previously reported.
A necrotic polyp occluding the external ear canal was still evident.
After 2 months of antituberculous medication, the headaches and otorrhea were controlled, and the swelling in the external ear canal subsided greatly.
If remedies aren't working, see your GP for stronger treatmen Swimmer's ear The medical name is otitis externa -inflammation of the external ear canal -but it's known as swimmer's ear because you can get it from swimming pools.
The main treatment is surgical excision with canaloplasty, possible meatoplasty, and skin grafting to the exposed external ear canal bone.
The most common malignant tumor in the middle ear is squamous cell carcinoma, which typically arises in the external ear canal and then extends from there into the tympanic cavity, the mastoid, or anteriorly.
Exostoses are composed of immature layers of lamellar bone that cause a progressive stenosis of the external ear canal.
an ear, nose and throat specialist at Sutter Health-affiliated Santa Cruz Medical Foundation, shows that patients suffering from an ear condition brought on by cold-water activities can rapidly heal following a safe and effective procedure employing chisels to remove bone growths that have built up in the external ear canal.
12,17) NTM, on the other hand, may enter the middle ear or mastoid cells via the external ear canal in a retrograde manner from the eustachian tube, and then spread from there either directly or through the blood vessels.