Fair Employment Commission

Fair Employment Commission

the body in Northern Ireland created by the Fair Employment (Northern Ireland) Act 1989 to promote equality of opportunity and eliminate unlawful discrimination on the grounds of religious belief or political opinion, and to promote affirmative action to help redress existing imbalances. It has a full-time chairman and eight part-time members, including three trade unionists and three representatives of employers, all of whom are appointed by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.
References in periodicals archive ?
ommission, The service are now demanding the Government set up a Fair Employment Commission, with powers to identify wrongdoing and to punish firms who flout the law and exploit their staff.
Fair Employment Commission To Investigate Conclave of Cardinals After Allegation That They Only Considered Members of Roman Catholic Community For Top Job.
The payment is believed to be the largest ever awarded in such a case before the Fair Employment Commission.
But she says the investigation conducted by Sir Bob Cooper, the former head of the Fair Employment Commission, failed to address any of her concerns.
Even today, the British Fair Employment Commission admits that a Catholic is two-and-a-half times more likely to be unemployed than a Protestant.
The CAS say a Fair Employment Commission would help to protect employees who are being victimised and exploited.
As the Northern Ireland Office and the Fair Employment Commission last night confirmed the pay-out, new details at the centre of the bombshell case emerged.
THE Fair Employment Commission has welcomed the Government's plans to tackle inequality in Northern Ireland.
A senior official of the Department of Economic Development, of which the Fair Employment Commission (formerly Agency) is a part, told a Belfast newspaper last year that they had not taken the McBride Principles very seriously at first, but they have "cost millions to try to counteract.