female

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Related to Females: female reproductive system

female

noun female being, female gender, female sex, gender, girl, her, herself, lady, miss, mrs., ms., she, woman
Associated concepts: women's rights
Foreign phrases: Feme, Femme.A woman. Feme covert. Amarried woman. Feme sole. A single woman.
References in classic literature ?
Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.
Not with my tongue: but with my eyes, a thousand times--and with all that unspeakable language that female invention can supply:--I go where he goes-- if I see him in the street behind me, I move slowly and with dignity; still he passes me--if before me, I am in a hurry--but{"}--
It was a female, of course, and her inquiries were about a piece of cambric handkerchiefs, which she said had been sent to this shop from a manufactory in Picardie.
Leaving these afflicted females, we passed on to the Hoolah Hoolah ground.
High up among the branches of a mighty tree she hugged the shrieking infant to her bosom, and soon the instinct that was as dominant in this fierce female as it had been in the breast of his tender and beautiful mother--the instinct of mother love--reached out to the tiny man-child's half-formed understanding, and he became quiet.
The females were more symmetrically proportioned than the males, their features were much more perfect, the shapes of their heads and their large, soft, black eyes denoting far greater intelligence and humanity than was possessed by their lords and masters.
He does not allow the most vigorous males to struggle for the females.
The Gauchos unanimously affirm that several females lay in one nest.
or do we entrust to the males the entire and exclusive care of the flocks, while we leave the females at home, under the idea that the bearing and suckling their puppies is labour enough for them?
In order to guard herself against matrimonial injuries in her own house, as she kept one maid-servant, she always took care to chuse her out of that order of females whose faces are taken as a kind of security for their virtue; of which number Jenny Jones, as the reader hath been before informed, was one.
Out of so large a number of females, many of whom were only then just verging upon womanhood, it may be reasonably supposed that some were delicate and fragile in appearance: no doubt there were.
Cos a coachman may do vithout suspicion wot other men may not; 'cos a coachman may be on the wery amicablest terms with eighty mile o' females, and yet nobody think that he ever means to marry any vun among