tradition

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tradition

same as TRADITIO.

TRADITION, contracts, civil law. The act by which a thing is delivered by one or more persons to one or more others.
     2. In sales it is the delivery of possession by the proprietor with an intention to transfer the property to the receiver. Two things are therefore requisite in order to transmit property in this way: 1. The intention or consent of the former owner to transfer it; and, 2. The actual delivery in pursuance of that intention.
     3. Tradition is either real or symbolical. The first is where the ipsa corpora of movables are put into the hands of the receiver. Symbolical tradition is used where the thing is incapable of real delivery, as, in immovable subjects, such as lands and houses; or such as consist in jure (things incorporeal) as things of fishing and the like. The property of certain movables, though they are capable of real delivery, may be transferred by symbol. Thus, if the subject be under look and key, the delivery of the key is considered as a legal tradition of all that is contained in the repository. Cujas, Observations, liv. 11, ch. 10; Inst. lib. 2, t. 1, Sec. 40; Dig. lib. 41, t. 1, 1. 9; Ersk. Princ. Laws of Scotl. bk. 2, t. 1, s. 10, 11; Civil Code Lo. art. 2452, et seq.
     4. In the common law the term used in the place of tradition is delivery. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
In 1923, some professors from Beijing University noted that modern Western scholars had paid great attention to research into folk customs.
I don't think that the authors considered the book as a full academic study of this folk custom, but it is an attractively set-out description of most aspects of wassailing, from house-visiting customs such as Mari Lwyd, to the more common wassailing of apple orchards or even single apple trees.
Folk beliefs, or superstitions, are yet another example of social and folk customs.
it draws from various cultural and historic traditions: from European folk customs, religions of Classical antiquity, ancient Egypt, the Celts, and the Norse, occasional appropriations from Native American or Afro-Caribbean traditions (7).
Hoffmann does not wish to dispute the fact that Stalinist culture advocated a traditional set of codes and values for social behaviour, supporting the patriarchal family, promoting clean living, and encouraging a healthy respect for both folk customs and so-called 'high' art.
Traditionally combining the colors of dark red, Chinese yellow, indigo, grass green, and antique purple in patterns expressing a love of nature and folk customs, this silk is renowned for its high quality.
Malcolm Jones is a leading English authority on medieval folklore and folk customs.
The books contain encyclopedic knowledge of Shui astronomy, geography, religion, law and folk customs.
Urban Chinese people spent the Thursday's Lantern Festival holiday with few traces of the traditional decorative festivities, indicating that centuries-old folk customs are growing obsolete.
The authors begin in the Anglo-Saxon period and move on to Kalends, Feasts of Fools, and other early folk customs.
In that period scores of descriptions of encounters were replaced by findings of Welsh artefacts, words and folk customs among Amerindians,' he says.
She utilizes Emmet Larkin's language of "devotional revolution," for example, to point to the institutional and sacramental transformation of Catholic devotional practice in the mid-nineteenth century, despite continuing examples of folk customs.