Garden


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GARDEN. A piece of ground appropriated to raising plants and flowers.
     2. A garden is a parcel of a house and passes with it. Br. Feoffm. de terre, 53; 2 Co. 32; Plowd. 171; Co. Litt. 5 b, 56 a, b. But see Moore, 24; Bac. Ab. Grants, I.

References in classic literature ?
I sat down in the middle of the garden, where snakes could scarcely approach unseen, and leaned my back against a warm yellow pumpkin.
He had a surly old face, and did not seem at all pleased to see her--but then she was displeased with his garden and wore her "quite contrary" expression, and certainly did not seem at all pleased to see him.
And there are plenty of vegetables left in the garden.
And she told him that a bottle would be found in her nest in the garden, containing some drops from the spring of healing.
Those are indeed holidays to me; I go into the garden, I plant, I prune, I trim, I kill the insects all day long.
I expected at least that the pigs were got into the garden, and here is nothing but Lady Catherine and her daughter.
It looked pleasant, to me--very pleasant, so long a time had elapsed since I had seen a garden of any sort.
cried Violet to her brother, who had gone to another part of the garden, "bring me some of that fresh snow, Peony, from the very farthest corner, where we have not been trampling.
Giovanni still found no better occupation than to look down into the garden beneath his window.
I had not meant by my private ejaculation that I must myself cultivate the soil of the tangled enclosure which lay beneath the windows, but the lady who came toward me from the distance over the hard, shining floor might have supposed as much from the way in which, as I went rapidly to meet her, I exclaimed, taking care to speak Italian: "The garden, the garden--do me the pleasure to tell me if it's yours
It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which, buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks; and a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection.
These people had a little window at the back of their house from which a splendid garden could be seen, which was full of the most beautiful flowers and herbs.