genealogy

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See: ancestry, blood, bloodline, descent, family, lineage, origin, parentage, race

GENEALOGY. The summary history or table of a house or family, showing how the persons there named are connected together.
     2. It is founded on the idea of a lineage or family. Persons descended from the common father constitute a family. Under the idea of degrees is noted the nearness or remoteness, of relationship, in which one person stands with respect to another. A series of several persons, descended from a common progenitor, is called a line. (q. v.) Children stand to each other in the relation either of full blood or half blood, according as they are descended from the same parents, or have only one parent in common. For illustrating descent and relationship, genealogical tables are constructed, the order of which depends on the end in view. In tables, the object of which is to show all the individuals embraced in a family, it is usual to begin with the oldest progenitor, and to put all the persons of the male or female sex in descending, and then in collateral lines. Other tables exhibit the ancestors of a particular person in ascending lines both on the father's and mother's side. In this way 4, 8, 16, 32- &c. ancestors are exhibited, doubling at every degree. Some tables are constructed in the form of a tree, after the. model of canonical law, (arbor consanguinitatis,) in which the progenitor is placed beneath, as if for the root or stem. Vide Branch; Line.

References in periodicals archive ?
Social organization and geneaology of resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the coastal waters of British Columbia and Washington State.
Black-and-white photographs illustrate the meticulous narration; all equine geneaology material is heavily researched and condenced in tree form at the close of the book.
This is without a doubt the very real danger in this geneaology caper.
Lehtola emphasizes points of change, offering something like a Foucauldian geneaology of significant historical moments in order to demonstrate Sami adaptability.