genetic

(redirected from Genetic defects)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Correcting the underlying genetic defects has the potential to fully restore hearing, but previous attempts to reverse hearing loss caused by genetic mutations have not been successful.
Because perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake, we focused on the genetic defects causing CH involving the iodination process of the THs, particularly a) defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell; b) defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen, often combined with inner ear deafness [Pendred syndrome (PDS)]; and c) defects of iodide organification.
announced today the results from a proof-of-concept, Phase 1b clinical trial assessing the safety and efficacy of setmelanotide (RM-493), the company's novel melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) agonist, in obese patients with a heterozygous genetic defect in MC4R.
Washington, March 3 ( ANI ): Researchers have said that women are able to carry higher levels of genetic defects without getting any brain development disorders like autism, supporting the possibility of a "female protective effect.
The research shows the genetic defects mainly arise anew in fathers, especially those who are older.
Some 87% of women whose embryos were checked for genetic defects went on to have a healthy baby, or were about to give birth to one.
In the new study, researchers transplanted retinal cells from fetal mice, newborns, or adults to mice that, because of genetic defects, had lost their rods and thus their night vision.
However, the mechanisms for the effect of older paternal age on genetic defects are not well understood.
Two studies presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine conference in Montreal in October 2005 found that embryos created in fertility clinics contain far more genetic defects than was previously believed to be the case, even when created from eggs donated by young, healthy women.
The research, intended to prevent the transmission of genetic defects, does not involve human cloning, they said.
There is, for example, a very gasp-worthy moment at the end of a doctor's short monologue about disease and genetic defects.
Her 1999 work, For the Time Being, seems at first to be impossibly disjointed, juxtaposing sections on the personal life of the great Jesuit scientist and theologian, Teilhard de Chardin, with bits of Chinese history, Jewish mysticism, observations of nature, facts about natural disasters, descriptions of babies born with terrible genetic defects, a natural history of sand and a catalogue of clouds.