genre

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Related to Genres: Genres of music

genre

noun breed, category, character, class, denomination, description, designation, division, form, generic class, genus, group, nature, species, specific category, specific class, specific type, type, variety
See also: class, denomination, kind, style
References in periodicals archive ?
While it will certainly leave the more seasoned horror film scholar frustrated, it is a fine introduction for undergraduates and would be effective as a springboard for a more comprehensive study of the genre in a horror film course.
This is a fairly complex subject and much debate exists not only around how you define various genres of music, but also where they initially came from.
Chapter 1, entitled "The Old Imperial Code," begins with the discussion of Bell's Classical Arrangement of Fugitive Poetry, an anthology published in 1789 which attempted to arrange non-canonical poems along the lines of a neo-Aristotelian genre system.
Through its impressive, multifaceted, and scrupulously researched consideration of the relationship between literary genre and gender, Engendering Genre is required reading for scholars of Atwood and genre alike.
Raphaelle Moine successfully broadens the scholarly focus of film genre research by setting a stage for genre studies that supersedes mere function and ideology.
New research shows that searching for the temporal aspects of songs - their rhythm - might be better to find music you like than using current automatic genre classifications.
established the corpus of each of these genres with consistent and
Maria Pramaggiore shows bow Nell Jordan's The Good Thief (2002) uses the gothic genre as a postmodern tool for the transgression of historical, aesthetic, and social boundaries.
Considered the fastest-growing genre in the music biz, the hot dance music has also made an impact in concert halls.
Ample books are available on armadillos that illustrate a variety of genres and writing styles.
Volumes such as Selected Works of Georgia Douglas Johnson, including Claudia Tate's valuable introduction and Hull's Color Sex and Poetry consider Johnson's work in all genres but focus predominantly on her poetry.
Introduced by a captivating title, Sherry Roush's book, Hermes' Lyre, is an original and very interesting study of a literary genre that "has somehow not received the attention it deserves" (7), poetic self-commentary.