German


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Related to German: Germany

GERMAN, relations, germanus. Whole or entire, as respects genealogy or descent; thus, "brother-german," denotes one who is brother both by the father and mother's side cousins-germane" those in the first and nearest degree, i. e., children of brothers or sisters. Tech. Dict.; 4 M. & C. 56.

References in classic literature ?
I shall not mar Garnharn's translation by meddling with its English; for the most toothsome thing about it is its quaint fashion of building English sentences on the German plan-- and punctuating them accordingly to no plan at all.
George Bartram, nephew of the Admiral, and now staying on a short visit in the house at German Place.
To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London, and sketched the following Manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.
I mentioned to you before that my expectation of rough usage, in consequence of my German nationality, had proved completely unfounded.
The Frau Professor insisted that nothing but German should be spoken, so that Philip, even if his bashfulness had permitted him to be talkative, was forced to hold his tongue.
Then the German alliance still struggled to achieve its dream of imperial expansion, and its imposition of the German language upon a forcibly united Europe.
They said it was so funny that, when Herr Slossenn Boschen had sung it once before the German Emperor, he (the German Emperor) had had to be carried off to bed.
Casaubon read German he would save himself a great deal of trouble.
I was in a fever to know more of him, and it was my great good luck to fall in with a German in the village who had his books.
He saw that these natives were all secured by neck chains and he also saw that the troops were composed of native soldiers in German uniforms.
We hoisted the Union Jack and remained on deck, asking Bradley to go below and assign to each member of the crew his duty, placing one Englishman with a pistol beside each German.
It was impossible for any word of their presence in Ossray to have been known to the Germans.