Code of Hammurabi

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Code of Hammurabi

The Code of Hammurabi was a comprehensive set of laws, considered by many scholars to be the oldest laws established; they were handed down four thousand years ago by King Hammurabi of Babylon. Although the Code of Hammurabi was essentially humanitarian in its intent and orientation, it contained the "eye for an eye" theory of punishment, which is a barbarian application of the concept of making the punishment fit the crime. The Code of Hammurabi recognized such modern concepts as that of corporate personality.

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17) In another instance in Hammurabi's law we read: "May Zababa, the mighty warrior, the firstborn son of Ekur, who marches at the right hand, shatter his weapons on the field of battle
s cursory reading of Deuteronomy 17 contrasts it with the imperial realities implicit in Hammurabi's Law Code, rather than reading this chapter against Israel's own struggles with kingship before and during the exile.
In Hammurabi's law collection, for example, the laws regarding the goring ox began with a case in which the ox is a victim and proceed by degrees up to the case in which a human is a victim.
Nissenbaum (1994) has also identified the example of Hammurabi's Laws, and observes that there is a tendency in today's computer industry for producers of computer systems not to be fully answerable for the impacts of their products.