harbor

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Harbor

As a noun, a haven, or a space of deep water so sheltered by the adjacent land and surroundings as to afford a safe anchorage for ships.

As a verb, to afford lodging to, to shelter, or to give a refuge to. To clandestinely shelter, succor, and protect improperly admitted Aliens. It may be aptly used to describe the furnishing of shelter, lodging, or food clandestinely or with concealment, and under certain circumstances may be equally applicable to those acts divested of any accompanying secrecy. Harboring a criminal is a crime under both federal and state statutes and a person who harbors a criminal is an Accessory after the fact.

harbor

verb afford sanctuary, aid, cache, care for, cloak, conceal, cover, defend, ensconce, give refuge, grant asylum, guard, haven, hide, insure, keep, keep out of sight, keep safe, keep secret, lodge, look after, maintain, protect, provide refuge, provide safety, provide sanctuary, quarter, safeguard, screen, seclude, secrete, shelter, shield, shroud, stow away, sustain, watch
Associated concepts: accessory after the fact, alienation of affections, assisting escape, harbor and secrete, harboring a criminal, harboring a fugitive, harboring an animal
See also: conceal, cover, foster, guard, haven, hide, house, lodge, lodging, nurture, preserve, protect, protection, refuge, screen, shelter

HARBOR. A place where ships may ride with safety; any navigable water protected by the surrounding country; a haven. (q.v.) It is public property. 1. Bouv. Inst. n. 435.

TO HARBOR, torts. To receive clandestinely or without lawful authority a person for the purpose of so concealing him that another having a right to the lawful custody of such person, shall be deprived of the same; for example, the harboring of a wife or an apprentice, in order to deprive the husband or the master of them; or in a less technical sense, it is the reception of persons improperly. 10 N. H. Rep. 247; 4 Scam. 498.
     2. The harboring of such persons will subject the harborer to an, action for the injury; but in order to put him completely in the wrong, a demand should be made for their restoration, for in cases where the harborer has not committed any other wrong than merely receiving the plaintiff's wife, child, or apprentice, he may be under no obligation to return them without a demand. 1 Chit. Pr. 564; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.; 2 N. Car. Law Repos. 249; 5 How. U. S. Rep. 215, 227.

References in classic literature ?
If, on the other hand, I swim further in search of some shelving beach or harbour, a hurricane may carry me out to sea again sorely against my will, or heaven may send some great monster of the deep to attack me; for Amphitrite breeds many such, and I know that Neptune is very angry with me.
Towards noon we drew abreast the entrance go the harbour, and at last we slowly swept by the intervening promontory, and entered the bay of Nukuheva.
Indeed, the offer meant a plain and sure road to all desirable things; but Dan thought most of commanding watch on broad decks, and looking into far-away harbours.
The Temple, Chancery Lane, Serjeants' Inn, and Lincoln's Inn even unto the Fields are like tidal harbours at low water, where stranded proceedings, offices at anchor, idle clerks lounging on lop-sided stools that will not recover their perpendicular until the current of Term sets in, lie high and dry upon the ooze of the long vacation.
Pray explain everything to his satisfaction; or, if he still harbours any doubt, a line from himself to me, or a call at Putney when next in town, might set all to rights.