quackery

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3 billion in health fraud settlements & judgments recouped by federal government
However, the report noted that fewer resources were available for the federal government to fight health fraud and abuses because of sequestration of mandatory funding in 2014.
Gary Coody, RPh, national health fraud coordinator at FDA, calls the site "one-stop shopping" for people who want to learn how to recognize and avoid health fraud scams.
All wages new battle in ongoing war against Internet health fraud.
assistant clinical professor of medicine, Boston University School of Medicine; and president, National Council Against Health Fraud, Inc.
Health fraud has also had a negative effect on the legitimate forms of alternative therapies that are practiced.
The few billion paid out in recent false claims lawsuits by major firms are seen by the drug companies as "just a cost of doing business," says Shelley Slade, a former Justice Department health fraud attorney who specializes in representing false claims plaintiffs.
Health Robbers is a comprehensive book on health fraud that discusses specific forms of quackery, why quackery persists, and what can be done about fraud.
Baratz, a Boston-area internist and president of the National Council Against Health Fraud, does not see the value in fasting.
After a grand jury investigation, Walker and Green were arrested Wednesday and, along with Garabet, face seven counts of health fraud, carrying a maximum statutory penalty of 10 years in federal prison.
Drawing on novels, cartoons, trade magazines, health fraud investigation records, newspapers, and manuals as well as close readings of print advertisements, de la Pena argues that mechanization and industrialization not only generated new modes of production, but also new experiences of the human body.
Unfortunately, many Americans do fall prey to this kind of quackery, particularly the elderly who tend to be targeted by the marketers of health fraud products and services.

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