lesion

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Related to Hill-Sachs lesion: reverse Hill Sachs lesion, Bankart lesion

lesion

injury or loss. In the civil law jurisdictions the word is often used in the context of an ‘unfair’ loss, as where an adult takes advantage of a minor or someone purchases something for much less than it's worth.

LESION, contracts. In the civil law this term is used to signify the injury suffered, in consequence of inequality of situation, by one who does not receive a full equivalent for what he gives in a commutative contract.
     2. The remedy given for this injury, is founded on its being the effect of implied error or imposition; for in every commutative contract, equivalents are supposed to be given and received. Louis. Code, 1854. Persons of full age, however, are not allowed in point of law to object to their agreements as being injurious, unless the injury be excessive. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 4. But minors are admitted to restitution, not only against any excessive inequality, but against any inequality whatever. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 5; Louis. Code, art. 1858.
     3. Courts of chancery relieve upon terms of redemption and set aside contracts entered into by expectant heirs dealing for their expectancies, on the ground of mere inadequacy of price. 1 Vern. 167; 2 Cox, 80; 2 Cas. in Ch. 136; 1 Vern. 141; 2 Vern. 121; 2 Freem. 111; 2 Vent. 359; 2 Vern. 14; 2 Rep. in Ch. 396; 1 P. W. 312; 1 Bro. C. C. 7; 3 P. Wms. 393, n.; 2 Atk. 133; 2 Ves. 125; 1 Atk. 301; 1 Wils. 286; 1 Wils. 320; 1 Bro. P. 6. ed. Toml. 198; 1 Bro. C. C. 1; 16 Ves. 512; Sugd. on Vend. 231, n. k.; 1 Ball & B. 330; Wightw. 25; 3 Ves. & Bea. 117; 2 Swanst. R. 147, n.; Fonb. notes to the Treatise of Equity, B, 1, c. 2, s. 9. A contract cannot stand where the party has availed himself of a confidential situation, in order to obtain some selfish advantage. Note to Crowe v. Ballard. 1 Ves. jun. 125; 1 Hov. Supp. 66, 7. Note to Wharton v. May. 5 Ves. 27; 1 Hov. Supp. 378. See Catching bargain; Fraud; Sale.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Hill-Sachs lesion, as it has come to be known, was originally described as a "compression fracture" of the posterolateral humeral head manifested as a line of condensation that appears on radiographs best identified on the internal rotation view.
Reverse lesions typically sustain more articular damage than the traditional Hill-Sachs lesion.
They suggested that "a severe Hill-Sachs lesion may be a factor in recurrent dislocation following Bankart repair.
25,27) Isolated soft-tissue stabilization with an all-arthroscopic revision Bankart repair can be successfully performed in symptomatic patients with unidirectional instability and absence of a Hill-Sachs lesion or a non-engaging lesion.
With new advancements in treatments and arthroscopic portal placements, the engaging Hill-Sachs lesion is no longer a contraindication to arthroscopic surgery.
Use of allograft for large Hill-Sachs lesion associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation.
Recent reports in the orthopaedic literature have shown promising results of osteochondral allograft implantation for cases of glenohumeral instability including engaging Hill-Sachs lesions and glenoid bone defects.
Following completion of the deltopectoral approach and joint exposure, the humeral head was externally rotated, a retractor was placed in the joint to protect the glenoid surface, and the Hill-Sachs lesion was exposed.
In all cases, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion was noted on preoperative exam under anesthesia; preoperative and intraoperative direct observation demonstrated that the Hill-Sachs lesions were large (approximately 40% of the articular surface).
The patient may experience apprehension with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation that may not be relieved by posteriorly directed pressure over the anterior shoulder (relocation test), as this maneuver cannot account for the patient's sensation of "falling into" the Hill-Sachs lesion.
Specialized views include the Stryker notch view, (30) which aids in the evaluation of a Hill-Sachs lesion; the West Point Axillary view, (31) which is used to evaluate anteroinferior glenoid rim fractures; and the apical oblique view of Garth, (32) which is useful for the identification of anteroinferior glenoid fractures, labral calcifications, and for the evaluation of Hill-Sachs lesions.