Horse


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HORSE. Until a horse has attained the age of four years, he is called a colt. (q.v.) Russ. & Ry. 416. This word is sometimes used as a generic name for all animals of the horse kind. 3 Brev. 9. Vide Colt; Gender; and Yelv. 67, a.

References in classic literature ?
Now his middle horse was being almost dragged by the other two.
While the common herd stood aloof, in deference to the quarters of Webb, the figure we have described stalked into the center of the domestics, freely expressing his censures or commendations on the merits of the horses, as by chance they displeased or satisfied his judgment.
Well, no," she said, "you must not say that; but though I am an old horse, and have seen and heard a great deal, I never yet could make out why men are so fond of this sport; they often hurt themselves, often spoil good horses, and tear up the fields, and all for a hare or a fox, or a stag, that they could get more easily some other way; but we are only horses, and don't know.
That's one of our recruits," said the old mule to the troop horse.
It is this, Sire, that makes the horse so marvellous, and if your Highness will allow me, you can prove it for yourself.
When his father had gone, a robber passed by and saw the horse grazing without any one watching it, for of course he could not see the Hazel-nut child hidden in the grass.
That horse was to have identified us in the day of battle.
I have passed a considerable part of my life in the East, madame, and you are doubtless aware that the Orientals value only two things -- the fine breeding of their horses and the beauty of their women.
But at last the lieutenant's horse refused to go on; he could not breathe; one last spur, instead of making him advance, made him fall.
Each warrior has his horse tied by one foot at night to a stake planted before his lodge.
The horse bounded in his anguish as the arrow pierced his brain, and his struggles threw others into confusion.
As soon as a horse was purchased, his tail was cropped, a sure mode of distinguishing him from the horses of the tribe; for the Indians disdain to practice this absurd, barbarous, and indecent mutilation, invented by some mean and vulgar mind, insensible to the merit and perfections of the animal.