hostage

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hostage

noun bond, captive, collateral, guarantee, internee, obses, pledge, political prisoner, prisoner, real security, security
Associated concepts: false imprisonment, kidnapping, ransom

HOSTAGE. A person delivered into the possession of a public enemy in the time of war, as a security for the performance of a contract entered into between the belligerents.
     2. Hostages are frequently given as a security for the payment of a ransom bill, and if they should die, their death would not discharge the contract. 3 Burr. 1734; 1 Kent, Com. 106; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Russian authorities said the hostage-taking incident took place around 9 p.
One of the two missing men, Richard Frank Keyes, is charged with organized criminal activity and aggravated kidnapping in connection with the hostage-taking that sparked the standoff.
Police sealed off the island following the hostage-taking.
Legislators in Hong Kong were high-strung as they discussed Manila's tragic hostage-taking incident last Monday.
A law enforcement official familiar with the case said that the teenager was being charged under two obscure federal laws that deal with piracy and hostage-taking.
Mr Markelov had worked for activists who battled abuses by Russia's military, and represented a Chechen woman who was a victim in a 2002 hostage-taking attack on a Moscow theatre.
He said: "There is a strong view of the British government and the international community that payments for hostage-taking only encourage further hostage-taking.
President Nicholas Sarkozy said he has thanked the French army and other French agencies "that allowed a quick end" to the hostage-taking.
He is accused of involvement in a hostage-taking incident in Yemen in 1998 in which four hostages ( including Durham University mathematics lecturer Dr Peter Rowe ( were killed.
Hamza was accused of playing a leading role in a hostage-taking incident in Yemen in 1998 in which four hostages ( including three Britons ( were killed.
The 12-hour hostage-taking began when a disgruntled policeman, former Inspector Rolando Mendoza, armed with an M16 assault rifle, hijacked a bus that carried 25 Hong Kong tourists and Filipino tour assistants.
Hostage-taking has been a tool of Iranian foreign policy going back to 1979, and this was merely another turn of that wheel.