House of Commons


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House of Commons

in the constitutional law of the UK, one of the two chambers of Parliament, the other being the HOUSE OF LORDS. Members are called simply Members of Parliament, abbreviated to MP. Many classes of people are disqualified from sitting, including those suffering from mental illness, peers, criminals, aliens and certain clergyman. Judges, civil servants and members of the armed forces and the police are all also disqualified. Day-to-day business is organized by the Speaker, and the party officials are known as whips.

HOUSE OF COMMONS, Eng. law. The representatives of the people, in contradistinction to the nobles, taken collectively are called the house of commons.
     2. This house must give its consent to all bills before they acquire the authority of law, and all laws for raising revenue must originate there.

References in classic literature ?
Really, now that the House of Commons is trying to become useful, it does a great deal of harm.
Thanks to compact organization, they were loosening the bonds of their dependence on the lords or bishops to whom most of them paid taxes; and the alliance of their representatives with the knights of the shire (country gentlemen) in the House of Commons, now a separate division of Parliament, was laying the foundation of the political power of the whole middle class.
He would undertake to prove before a committee of the House of Commons, that there existed a combination to keep up the price of muffins, and to give the bellmen a monopoly; he would prove it by bellmen at the bar of that House; and he would also prove, that these men corresponded with each other by secret words and signs as 'Snooks,' 'Walker,' 'Ferguson,' 'Is Murphy right?
The man with the blue coat and the roll of paper is Sir William Baskerville, who was Chairman of Committees of the House of Commons under Pitt.
Blake, the elder, was up to his eyes in the business of the House of Commons, and was amusing himself at home that night with the favourite parliamentary plaything which they call "a private bill.
Then, giving the Home Department and the leadership of the House of Commons to Joodle, the Exchequer to Koodle, the Colonies to Loodle, and the Foreign Office to Moodle, what are you to do with Noodle?
I have borne the House of Commons like a man, and have yielded to no weakness, but slumber, in the House of Lords.
I recall him bending his aching head, supported on his bony hand, over the book on his desk, and wretchedly endeavouring to get on with his tiresome work, amidst an uproar that might have made the Speaker of the House of Commons giddy.
Nunc vino pellite curas, Cras ingens iterabimus aequor,'" and the Bacchanalian, quoting the above with a House of Commons air, tossed off nearly a thimbleful of wine with an immense flourish of his glass.
Dalloway and the habit, now fallen into decline, of quoting Greek in the House of Commons, noted, in the great commonplace book that lies open beside us as we talk, the fact that all men, even men like Ridley, really prefer women to be fashionable.
He waved his horrid hand at me--he struck his infectious breast-- he addressed me oratorically, as if I was laid up in the House of Commons.
Her mental powers were those of the English "country gentleman" who, hearing constant mention of "posterity" in the House of Commons, rose to make the speech that has since become celebrated: "Gentlemen," he said, "I hear much talk in this place about Posterity.