factor

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Factor

An event, circumstance, influence, or element that plays a part in bringing about a result.

A factor in a case contributes to its causation or outcome. In the area of Negligence law, the factors, or chain of causation, are important in determining whether liability ensues from a particular action done by the defendant.

factor

n. 1) a salesman who sells in his/her own name on behalf of others, taking a commission for services. 2) something that contributes to the result.

factor

(Commission merchant), noun agent, broker, commercial agent, delegate, deputy, envoy, interagent, manager, medium, middleman, one who sells for factorage, proctor, procurator, representative
Associated concepts: consignee, factors' lien

factor

(Ingredient), noun additive, agent, aid, aspect, cause, component, constituent, constitutive element, content, contributing force, determinant, element, elementary unit, feature, integral part, part, portion, segment, unit
See also: aspect, broker, cause, characteristic, component, constituent, dealer, deputy, determinant, element, feature, ingredient, member, part, plenipotentiary, portion, procurator, reason, represent, substitute

factor

1 a mercantile agent. An agent who is in the ordinary course of business entrusted with goods or documents of title representing goods with a view to their sale. A factor has a lien over goods entrusted to him; this lien covers any claims he may have against his principal arising out of the agency. Most factors will be mercantile agents (and have the powers of such) for the purposes of the Factors Act 1889. Under this Act, in certain circumstances a factor may pass a good title to goods entrusted to him.
2 an institution to whom a company assigns its book debts (see FACTORING).
3 in Scotland a landlord or superior's agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Simulated use trials provide a very useful indication of the influence of human factors on the effectiveness of a device--that is the ability of users to operate the device without impacting its efficacy.
Human Factors terms consistent with this theory include conspicuity, adaptation, automatic behaviour, cue generalising, top-down and bottom-up task relevance and hindsight bias.
On the latter point, FHWA's Human Factors for Limited-Ability Autonomous Driving Systems, an EAR project, aims to investigate driver engagement through the development of limitedability autonomous driving systems.
The Human Factor Leadership Academy will focus on producing honest and compassionate leaders who will grow in positive human factor qualities that they can apply in all spheres of human endeavors.
An engaging multi-disciplinary stakeholder day on human factors and the implications for patient safety led to the formation of the Human Factors Task and Finish group.
Therefore, human factors are applied to improve usability.
Addressing human factors in roadway planning and design can help make roadways safer and reduce the likelihood of these factors contributing to injuries and fatalities.
Human factors involves the application of what we know about people, their abilities, characteristics, and limitations to the design of equipment they use, environments in which they function, and jobs they perform.
The US FDA has requested that the company assess the root cause(s) of device use errors observed in the human factors testing.
Office workers are interrupted an average of six times an hour; some workers welcome the breaks if they're bored with the task at hand, but the interruptions could compromise their performance, according to the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.
AS PRESIDENT OF THE HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS Society, Andrew Imada brings a wealth of experience to the role, which he assumes in October.
WE PERIODICALLY DO a simple analysis called "mishap binning" to trend material failures, overall human factors and aircrew human factors.

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