memory

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Related to Immunological memory: immunological tolerance

memory

(Commemoration), noun celebration, writing

memory

(Retention), noun mind, recalling, reflection
See also: hindsight, recognition, recollection, remembrance, retention, retrospect

MEMORY. Understanding; a capacity to make contracts, a will, or to commit a crime, so far as intention is necessary.
     2. Memory is sometimes employed to express the capacity of the understanding, and sometimes its power; when we speak of a retentive memory, we use it in the former sense; when of a ready memory, in the latter. Shelf. on Lun. Intr. 29, 30.
     3. Memory, in another sense, is the reputation, good or bad, which a man leaves at his death. This memory, when good, is highly prized by the relations of the deceased, and it is therefore libelous to throw a shade over the memory of the dead, when the writing has a tendency to create a breach of the peace, by inciting the friends and relations of the deceased to avenge the insult offered to the family. 4 T. R. 126; 5 Co. R. 125; Hawk. b. 1, c. 73, s. 1.

MEMORY, TIME OF. According to the English common law, which has been altered by 2 & 3 Wm. IV., c. 71, the time of memory commenced from the reign of Richard the First, A. D. 1189. 2 Bl. Com. 31.
     2. But proof of a regular usage for twenty years, not explained or contradicted, is evidence upon which many public and private rights are held, and sufficient for a jury in finding the existence of an immemorial custom or prescription. 2 Saund. 175, a, d; Peake's Ev. 336; 2 Price's R. 450; 4 Price's R. 198.

References in periodicals archive ?
To further investigate the importance of Oct1 and OCA-B in immunological memory, the researchers examined mice lacking either one of the two genes.
An adolescent booster dose, although not routinely recommended, merits consideration, as immunological memory against HBsAg is lost in a significant number of adolescents by the age of 15 years.
Influenza virus-specific immunological memory is enhanced by repeated social defeat.
Pearce added: "We serendipitously discovered that the metabolizing, or burning, of fatty acids by T-cells following the peak of infection is critical to establishing immunological memory.
Extensively updated, the textbook includes new chapters on innate and adaptive immunity, enhanced treatment of aspects of innate immunity such as the complement system and defensins, immunotherapies, and the nature of immune response in mucosal tissues and immunological memory.