impeach

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Impeach

To accuse; to charge a liability upon; to sue. To dispute, disparage, deny, or contradict; as in to impeach a judgment or decree, or impeach a witness; or as used in the rule that a jury cannot impeach its verdict. To proceed against a public officer for crime or misfeasance, before a proper court, by the presentation of a written accusation called Articles of Impeachment.

In the law of evidence, the testimony of a witness is impeached by earlier statements that the witness has made if they are inconsistent with the statements to which the witness testifies.

impeach

v. 1) to attempt to prove that a witness has not told the truth or has been inconsistent, by introducing contrary evidence, including statements made outside of the courtroom in depositions or in statements of the witness heard by another. 2) to charge a public official with a public crime for which the punishment is removal from office. One President, Andrew Johnson in 1868, was charged with violation of federal laws in a politically-motivated impeachment, but was acquitted by the margin of one vote in a trial held by the Senate. President Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 rather than face impending impeachment charges brought by the House of Representatives in the Watergate affair, in which he obstructed the investigation and lied to Congress about his participation. Several federal judges have been impeached and nine have been found guilty by the Senate.

impeach

verb accusare, accuse, accuse of maladminnstration, accuse of misconduct, admonish, animadvert, attack, attaint, blame, bring a charge, bring charges, bring into discredit, bring to account, bring to justice, bring up for investigation, call in question, call to account, cast an immutation upon, cast blame upon, castigate, censure, challenge, challenge the credibility of, charge, charge to, charge with, complain against, condemn, confute, criticize, declaim against, decry, denigrate, denounce, denunciate, disapprove, discredit, disparage, dispute, expose, fault, file a claim, find an indictment against, hold at fault, implicate, impugn, impute fault to, inculpate, incur blame, indict, indict for maladministration, prefer a claim, prefer charges, put on trial, put the blame on, rebuff, recriminate, reproach, reprove, ridicule, take to account, vituperate
Associated concepts: impeach a government official, immeach a witness
See also: accuse, betray, blame, cite, condemn, defame, denounce, depose, disapprove, discharge, dismiss, except, fault, impugn, inform, object, remove, reprehend, reprimand, sully
References in periodicals archive ?
Reynaldo Umali said his committee would dispose of the impeachment complaints in two hearings.
Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez has said the lower House could only attend to the impeachment complaint against the President, having no time anymore for the two other planned impeachment complaints against Vice President Leni Robredo and Ombudsman Conchita Carpio Morales.
On March 17, 2010, the Senate organized for the impeachment trial
11, 2010, to approve four articles of impeachment against Judge
The Court shall not have the power to review impeachments against other officers nor any action by the Senate concerning articles of impeachment.
In the twentieth century, prior to the impeachment of President Clinton, only judges have been impeached (although President Nixon would almost certainly have been impeached had he not resigned).
His section about impeachment is more interesting, but our current ambivalent attitude toward impeachment does not spring from the history of the Blount episode.
Impeachment reflects our political and human natures.
To resist that possibility, Sunstein insisted that impeachments be limited to "a narrow category of egregious or large-scale abuses of authority that comes from the exercise of distinctly presidential powers.
An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton, by Richard A.
With the Senate lurching toward a showdown this week over whether to end the historic proceedings, Democrats attacked the House impeachment managers over their secret attempt to compel Lewinsky to submit to questioning without the Senate's approval.
From time to time, there have been impeachments without disqualification and the impeached officeholder remains competent to occupy yet another position of public trust.