impeach

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Impeach

To accuse; to charge a liability upon; to sue. To dispute, disparage, deny, or contradict; as in to impeach a judgment or decree, or impeach a witness; or as used in the rule that a jury cannot impeach its verdict. To proceed against a public officer for crime or misfeasance, before a proper court, by the presentation of a written accusation called Articles of Impeachment.

In the law of evidence, the testimony of a witness is impeached by earlier statements that the witness has made if they are inconsistent with the statements to which the witness testifies.

impeach

v. 1) to attempt to prove that a witness has not told the truth or has been inconsistent, by introducing contrary evidence, including statements made outside of the courtroom in depositions or in statements of the witness heard by another. 2) to charge a public official with a public crime for which the punishment is removal from office. One President, Andrew Johnson in 1868, was charged with violation of federal laws in a politically-motivated impeachment, but was acquitted by the margin of one vote in a trial held by the Senate. President Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 rather than face impending impeachment charges brought by the House of Representatives in the Watergate affair, in which he obstructed the investigation and lied to Congress about his participation. Several federal judges have been impeached and nine have been found guilty by the Senate.

impeach

verb accusare, accuse, accuse of maladminnstration, accuse of misconduct, admonish, animadvert, attack, attaint, blame, bring a charge, bring charges, bring into discredit, bring to account, bring to justice, bring up for investigation, call in question, call to account, cast an immutation upon, cast blame upon, castigate, censure, challenge, challenge the credibility of, charge, charge to, charge with, complain against, condemn, confute, criticize, declaim against, decry, denigrate, denounce, denunciate, disapprove, discredit, disparage, dispute, expose, fault, file a claim, find an indictment against, hold at fault, implicate, impugn, impute fault to, inculpate, incur blame, indict, indict for maladministration, prefer a claim, prefer charges, put on trial, put the blame on, rebuff, recriminate, reproach, reprove, ridicule, take to account, vituperate
Associated concepts: impeach a government official, immeach a witness
See also: accuse, betray, blame, cite, condemn, defame, denounce, depose, disapprove, discharge, dismiss, except, fault, impugn, inform, object, remove, reprehend, reprimand, sully
References in periodicals archive ?
In practice, both impeachments and recalls are rare.
An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment and Trial of President Clinton.
The pardon power already excludes impeachments, but the Constitution does not specifically prohibit self-pardons for criminal actions, although none has ever been issued.
By the early 1970s, a new scholarly consensus had formed: Presidential impeachments could be a good thing, if the cause was just.
He does not challenge the public contributions of those scholars who actually had relevant expertise in the politics, history, and law of impeachments and the separation of powers, and his footnotes demonstrate his frequent reliance on their academic work.
A political firestorm erupted in President Clinton's impeachment trial Saturday, as his accusers stunned the White House by obtaining a court order to question Monica S.
The supermajority required for conviction means that such impeachments would be rare, but even the prospect of occasional impeachments could greatly increase accountability.
To bring the Senate impeachment trials of Justice Chase and President Johnson to life, Chief Justice Rehnquist discusses in some detail the personalities of the key figures in the Senate proceedings, the nature of the controversies giving rise to the impeachments of both Chase and Johnson, the legal strategies of those seeking and those opposing the removals of Chase and Johnson, and the reasons for and significance of the acquittals of both Chase and Johnson.
The written testimony, which Starr is set to give to the House Judiciary Committee today, goes significantly further than his impeachment referral to Congress, which was limited to his investigation of sex and perjury.
Since it remains doubtful that a president could be indicted before being impeached, the independent counsel's inquiries into presidential misconduct should most appropriately be seen as adjunct to the impeachment process.
But the lame duck limitation, even if it serves no other purpose, at least formally distinguishes Bill Clinton's case from earlier ones in which the Senate has held impeachment trials based on impeachments returned by the House of Representatives in the previous Congress.
Otherwise, the framers of the Constitution wouldn't have given the House of Representatives the exclusive authority to initiate steps to remove a president from office and the Senate the sole power to try impeachments.