Impertinence


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Impertinence

Irrelevancy; the flaw of bearing no reasonable relationship to the issues or proceeding at hand.

An impertinent question is one that is immaterial or has no logical relation to the issue or controversy before the court.

See: contempt, disrespect, inconsequence
References in classic literature ?
Guph was considerably shaken when he fell upon the hard ground, but he appeared to take no notice of the impertinence and composed himself to speak again to the Grand Gallipoot.
Pray do not think," he said, "that I should be guilty of such an impertinence.
The impertinence of Lady Lundie's message is no more than I should have expected from her," she said.
But immediately I was sensible of having committed an act of impertinence in so doing; for she coloured and hesitated; but after a moment's pause, with a kind of desperate frankness, she replied:-
I fear it will be considered an act of impertinence,' said 'to presume to look at a picture that the artist has turned to the wall; but may I ask -'
It is an act of very great impertinence, sir; and therefore I beg you will ask nothing about it, for your curiosity will not be gratified,' replied she, attempting to cover the tartness of her rebuke with a smile; but I could see, by her flushed cheek and kindling eye, that she was seriously annoyed.
But all here were free from such impertinence, not only those whose company is in all other places esteemed a favour from their equality of fortune, but even those whose indigent circumstances make such an eleemosynary abode convenient to them, and who are therefore less welcome to a great man's table because they stand in need of it.
But several facts passed: Charles pressed for them with an impertinence that the undergraduate could not withstand.
Vronsky in amazement raised his head, and stared, as he knew how to stare, not into the Englishman's eyes, but at his forehead, astounded at the impertinence of his question.
There might have been a touch of impertinence in the last words; on the other hand, it might have been but the native grace of Mr Fledgeby's manner.
You have always been brought up as a gentleman, and never as a man of business;' another touch of possible impertinence in this place; 'and perhaps you are but a poor man of business.
What's more, there is a sense of impertinence that marks all the debates that we see unfolding today between ruling party circles and the Turkish opposition.