Imprescriptibility


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Related to Imprescriptibility: Cautioner, Strictissimi juris

IMPRESCRIPTIBILITY. The state of being incapable of prescription.
     2. A property which is held in trust is imprescriptible; that is the trustee cannot acquire a title to it by prescription; nor can the borrower of a thing get a right to it by any lapse of time, unless he claims an adverse right to it during the time required by law.

References in periodicals archive ?
conventions provide for the imprescriptibility of crimes against
maintain that the imprescriptibility of genocide, crimes against
number of states introduced the principle of imprescriptibility of core
provided for the imprescriptibility of crimes against humanity,
implement the imprescriptibility principle because they have either not
For states parties to the 1968 Convention such a requirement emerges from the unrestricted temporal scope of the Convention, which refers to the imprescriptibility of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes "irrespective of their date of commission.
Although it did not provide for the imprescriptibility of core international crimes, Law No.
Under international human rights treaty law, imprescriptibility of reparation claims emerges from the right to an effective remedy, which is recognized in a number of human rights treaties and entails a right to accessible and effective reparation for violations suffered.
140) Referring to the principle of imprescriptibility of reparation claims for international crimes and Theo Van Boven's preliminary work on what would eventually become the Basic Principles on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Gross Violations, the Australian Human Rights Commission specifically recommended that the compensation mechanism not be subject to statutory limitation.
149) In addition, there is no reference to the imprescriptibility of reparation claims for slavery and other human rights crimes in the Declaration of the World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance, although the topic was discussed at length during the Conference and its preparatory regional conferences.
Switzerland's highest court, the Federal Supreme Court, examined the question of the imprescriptibility of reparation claims in the Spring case, holding that the principle that the prosecution of core international crimes was imprescriptible could not be transposed to reparation claims under Swiss administrative law.
The French Cour de Cassation has established that the imprescriptibility of crimes against humanity extends to reparation claims advanced by civil parties within the criminal proceedings.