Imputed


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Related to Imputed: imputed negligence

Imputed

Attributed vicariously.

In the legal sense, the term imputed is used to describe an action, fact, or quality, the knowledge of which is charged to an individual based upon the actions of another for whom the individual is responsible rather than on the individual's own acts or omissions. For example, in the law of agency, the actions of an agent performed during the course of employment will be attributed to the agent's principal. The doctrine of imputed Negligence makes one person legally responsible for the negligent conduct of another.

See: accused, alleged
References in classic literature ?
Crimes are imputed to you which had brought down far loftier heads than yours, monsieur," said the cardinal.
Some time after, the Shepherd, being imprisoned on a false accusation, was condemned "to be cast to the Lions" as the punishment for his imputed crime.
If, from your favourable judgment, I have conceived some esteem for them, it cannot be imputed to vanity; since I should have agreed as implicitly to your opinion, had it been given in favour of any other man's production.
The loan is under the $10,000 de minimis exception, so the imputed interest rules do not apply, unless the IRS determines that the purpose of the loan was tax avoidance.
It includes imputed financing, which is described in SFFAC no.
That act requires the Reserve Banks to set prices to recover, over the long run, their total operating costs of providing payment services to depository institutions, as well as the imputed costs they would have incurred and the imputed profits they would have expected to earn had the services been provided by a private business firm.
OTC), today reported first quarter consolidated net sales of $9,767,000 and net income after imputed dividends on preferred stocks of $235,000 or $0.
The imputed Table I cost is also extended to a retired employee.
8 percent of priced-services costs, including operating costs, imputed costs, and targeted return on equity (ROE, or net income), which amounts to a ten-year total net income of slightly less than $500 million.
Therefore, the excess of the expenses incurred -- dollar for dollar -- over the value imputed to the employee is nondeductible.
Much of this increase was for interest on long-term debt, and imputed interest on the convertible notes executed in 2005.