Inadvertence


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Inadvertence

The absence of attention or care; the failure of an individual to carefully and prudently observe the progress of a court proceeding that might have an effect upon his or her rights.

The term inadvertence is generally used in reference to a ground upon which a judgment may be set aside or vacated under the Rules of Federal Civil Procedure or state rules of civil procedure.

See: accident, contingency, inconsideration, laxity, miscue, neglect, negligence, omission, quirk
References in periodicals archive ?
It was thus unbearable for me to leave the books to people who would mock them, would impugn my honor when they examined them, would rejoice at my inadvertence and error when they paged through them, and would show one another my [own] shortcoming and failing on account of them.
88) Stewart's inadvertence requirement would cause no additional inconvenience to police, he reasoned, because if they knew about an item's location ahead of time, they could easily include it in their warrant application before the magistrate.
Voluntary, reliable confessions are excluded from evidence for technical violations of Miranda, even when there is no suggestion of police wrongdoing or external coercion of any kind, just inadvertence or confusion, instead.
Any given author can of course omit, either through inadvertence or lack of space, an important topic, but the editor of the volume, a distinguished historian of mathematics, must take some responsibility for insuring that, somehow, the important areas are covered, and that was not done.
As an organization whose members work for large corporations, TEI does not have significant experience with the offer-in-compromise pro gram, which is intended to give taxpayers who fail to meet their obligations to the tax system (through inadvertence, volitional noncompliance, or pure happenstance) a second chance.
45) However, the inadvertence requirement was overruled in Horton v.
The government must prove only that an act that violated the law was done knowingly or absent mistake or inadvertence.
Under Rule 60(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a party may be relieved from a final judgment, order, or proceeding if the moving party can show mistake, inadvertence, surprise, or excusable neglect, or any other reason justifying relief from the operation of the judgment.
Here, the Delaware County court did not label its "Order for Modification" a nunc pro tunc order and nothing in the order itself shows that it was issued to correct an error or inadvertence appearing in the original order.
section] 1,482-iT(d)(1) provides that a section 482 allocation may be made in any case in which either by inadvertence or design the taxable income of a controlled taxpayer is other than it would have been had the taxpayer been dealing at arm's-length.