inference

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Inference

In the law of evidence, a truth or proposition drawn from another that is supposed or admitted to be true. A process of reasoning by which a fact or proposition sought to be established is deduced as a logical consequence from other facts, or a state of facts, already proved or admitted. A logical and reasonable conclusion of a fact not presented by direct evidence but which, by process of logic and reason, a trier of fact may conclude exists from the established facts. Inferences are deductions or conclusions that with reason and common sense lead the jury to draw from facts which have been established by the evidence in the case.

inference

n. a rule of logic applied to evidence in a trial, in which a fact is "proved" by presenting other "facts" which lead to only one reasonable conclusion--that if A and B are true, then C is. The process is called "deduction" or "deductive reasoning," and is a persuasive form of circumstantial evidence. (See: circumstantial evidence)

inference

noun allusion, assumption, conclusio, coniectura, conjecture, deduction, guess, hint, hypothesis, illation, implication, impression, inkling, judgment, observation, postulate, postulation, premise, presupposal, presupposition, speculation, supposal, supposition, surmise, suspicion, theorem, theory, thesis, understanding
Associated concepts: evidentiary inference, favorable inferrnce, legal inference, legitimate inference, presumption
Foreign phrases: Expressa nocent, non expressa non nooent.Things expressed may be prejudicial; that which is not expressed will not.
See also: conclusion, conjecture, connotation, construction, determination, generalization, hint, hypothesis, idea, innuendo, insinuation, intimation, mention, presumption, reference, referral, signification, speculation, suggestion, suspicion, uncertainty

INFERENCE. A conclusion drawn by reason from premises established by proof.
     2. It is the province of the judge who is to decide upon the facts to draw the inference. When the facts are submitted to the court, the judges draw the inference; when they are to be ascertained by a jury, it is their duty to do so. The witness is not permitted as a general rule to draw an inference, and testify that to the court or jury. It is his duty to state the facts simply as they occurred. Inferences differ from presumptions. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Upon reading Dowd's account on how close statisticians were to develop causal inference techniques by themselves, readers might be tempted to conclude that the distinction between causal and statistical inference is perhaps unwarranted, and that the former is but a nuance of the latter.
Diverse biological data derived from the repository will be combined with logic-based modeling and inference techniques developed by scientists at SRI International and cheminformatics-based computational prediction techniques developed by CDD.
Inference Techniques in Sparse Fuzzy Rule Bases, Proc.