inflection

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inflection

noun accent, accentuation, cadence, expression, intonation, modulation, pitch, stress, tone, voice change
Associated concepts: demeanor of a witness, polygraph test
See also: intonation, stress
References in periodicals archive ?
Under an approach of this kind, paradigms are recognised on the basis of semantic relations, and stem suppletion is a possibility in derivational paradigms just as it is, quite uncontroversially, in inflectional paradigms, (.
However, it is even more interesting to note that a typo-logical parallel is offered by the future tense of some New Indo-Aryan Languages of the east central zone (Eastern Hindi and Bihari group; Masica 1991: 289-91), where within the same inflectional paradigm the -h-future forms are in complementary distribution with -b-forms whose stem continues the old gerundive in -tavya-(on the corresponding finitization process, see Bubenik 1998: 193-95).
paradigmatic cohesion), "because what is most characteristic of these cases is that inflectional suffixes cease to be part of an inflectional paradigm (deparadigmaticization).
The group consists of ik-verbs whose inflectional paradigms are defective.
Since one of the major characteristics of the process of inflection is variation of both form and meaning/function with respect to a given word, an advantage of accepting disjunctive values is that it captures the fact that the same inflectional affix may participate in more than one inflectional paradigm.
We seem to have no problem in defining inflectional paradigms but when it comes to applying the notion of paradigm to derivation, we have to face one big problem; namely, what actually makes inflection typical of making up paradigms?
7) The only one of Mayerthaler's naturalness (sub-)principles that suppletive inflectional paradigms do not generally violate is semantic transparency.
Still in an inflectional paradigm, it is the genitive form that usually serves as the base of most case forms.
A more general question related to this "noise" might be to what extent inflectional paradigms with phonologically heavily reduced desinences can still provide a reliable base for a study that is grounded in iconicity between (phonological) form and meaning.
Its list of stems contains approximately 400 000 items, up to 1 600 inflectional paradigms (1) and it is able to generate approximately 6 million Czech word forms.
In order to further expand the SI-PRON word list, we are augmenting the SSKJ lemma descriptions with part-of-speech information and declension/conjugation categories (Toporisic, 1991), specifying the inflectional paradigms of the lemmas.
In more advanced interlanguage, studies by Lardiere (2000) and by Prevost and White (2000) also found verbal inflectional paradigms to be non-target-like, there being more errors of omission, rather than commission.