inmate

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inmate

noun captive, convict, dweller, inhabitant, lawbreaker, occupant, occupier, prisoner, resident, roomer
Associated concepts: inmate at a correctional institution
See also: captive, citizen, convict, denizen, habitant, inhabitant, lodger, occupant, patient, prisoner, resident

INMATE. One who dwells in a part of another's house, the latter dwelling, at the same time, in the said house. Kitch. 45, b; Com. Dig. Justices of the Peace, B 85; 1 B. & Cr. 578; 8 E. C. L. R. 153; 2 Dowl. & Ry. 743; 8 B. & Cr. 71; 15 E. C. L. R. 154; 2 Man. & Ry. 227; 9 B. & Cr. 176; 17 E. C. L. R. 385; 4 Man. & Ry. 151; 2 Russ. on Cr. 937; 1 Deac. Cr. L. 185; 2 East, P. Cr. 499, 505; 1 Leach's Cr. L. 90, 237, 427; Alcock's Registration Cases, 21; 1 Man. & Gra. 83; 39 E. C. L. R. 365. Vide Lodger.

References in periodicals archive ?
It was not closed until 1972, when inmates brought suit in a federal court against the repressive conditions at Parchman.
district court judge ruled that confinement in lockdown units was harmful to certain inmates, notably those with mental illnesses or those at risk of developing them.
Quiet, meek inmates, acting in concert and according to a strict timetable not only made for a stable institutional environment but would, in theory, make prisoners amenable to the rules of the wider community.
Another 285 inmates a day are in the vocational program, and 65 inmates per day get specialty education classes, which include lessons on parenting skills and avoiding drugs.
For AU's legal team, Pratt's meticulous 140-page ruling capped more than three years of hard work, including extensive research and on-site visits with inmates and their families in Newton.
He reported that during December he had consensual, unprotected, receptive anal intercourse with 2 male inmates at the correctional facility; both of these inmates had chronic HIV infection.
Many qualified inmates at USDB take advantage of the many treatment and vocational programs available.
This number represented approximately two-thirds of all inmates freed from custody that year.
In February 1999, the Sacramento Sheriffs Department settled a class-action lawsuit alleging numerous acts of torture, including mock executions, where guards strapped inmates into a restraint chair, coveted their faces with masks, and told the inmates they were about to be electrocuted.
When the smoke and rear gas cleared, 29 inmates and 10 prison guards had been killed, all, according to autopsy reports, by gunshot wounds inflicted by th e National Guardsmen.
The prison decided to serve meatless meals only to inmates who were vegetarian for health or religious reasons, and the court said there is a distinction between moral and religious beliefs (Sammons v.
inmates constitute 25 percent of the world's prisoners.