inquisition

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inquisition

noun examination, harassment, inquest, inquiry, interrogation, oppression, scrutiny, unfair inquiry
See also: chase, cross-examination, examination, hearing, indagation, inquiry, interrogation, legal proceeding, pursuit, question, research, scrutiny, study, test, trial

INQUISITION, practice. An examination of certain facts by a jury impanelled by the sheriff for the purpose; the instrument of writing on which their decision is made is also called an inquisition. The sheriff or coroner and the jury who make the inquisition, are called the inquest.
     2. An inquisition on an untimely death, if omitted by the coroner, may be taken by justices of gaol delivery and oyer and terminer. or of the peace, but it must be done publicly and openly, otherwise it will be quashed. Inquisitions either of the coroner, or of the other jurisdictions, are traversable. 1 Burr. 18, 19.

References in periodicals archive ?
Inquisitions, on the other hand, were moderating forces that saved countless thousands of lives.
Rituals of Prosecution: The Roman Inquisition and the Prosecution of Philo-Protestants in Sixteenth-Century Italy, by Jane K.
has written a remarkable, gendered approach to understanding the Hispanic inquisition of the 1390s.
Inquisitions, Murphy makes clear, invariably follow.
He insists that the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions must be studied together, although the book does not fully present a pan-Iberian framework (10).
He complained that people perceived the Inquisition as a single historical event when in fact there were several inquisitions over a long period of time.
Analysis of three narratives written in the form of dreams while the author was living as an exile in France will argue that his criticism of invented inquisitions and those individuals who work for them is not an apology for Judaism.
The purpose, according to a Vatican statement, is to locate and catalogue documents concerning both the Roman and the Spanish Inquisitions and make them easily available to scholars.
Ever since Emmanual Leroy Ladurie and Carlo Ginzburg revealed their potential a generation ago, social historians of late medieval and early modern Europe have explored the archives of the various Inquisitions in search of further insight into social behavior during those eras.
The author focuses on the third, using the accounts given by the crypto-Jews themselves, as preserved in the records of the Inquisitions of Spain, Portugal, Brazil, and the Viceroyalties in the New World.
But the failure of the Regensburg Colloquy in 1541, followed by the death of Contarini and the flight of other Italian reformers, dashed the hopes of moderate Catholic reform, and the creation of Inquisitions in Rome and Naples drove Italian evangelicals to shelter in Venice.
There are two instances when such inquisitions were carried out in the first century of the Abbasid Caliphate, the one started by al-Mahdi in 780 A.