Intemperance


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Intemperance

A lack of moderation. Habitual intemperance is that degree of intemperance in the use of intoxicating liquor which disqualifies the person a great portion of the time from properly attending to business. Habitual or excessive use of liquor.

Cross-references

Alcohol.

See: debauchery, dipsomania, exaggeration, greed, inebriation, waste
References in periodicals archive ?
Six sermons on the nature, occasions, signs, evils and remedy of intemperance (10th ed.
I think it is fair to say that we live in a culture dominated by intemperance.
While raising the topic of domestic practitioners--women dosing their children in this case--the even more spectacular and associated topic of intemperance goes unmentioned here.
Heroic narratives are reserved for personages who model excess in some glorious way, and often are disruptive of the social values being espoused by the epic: the anger of Achilles, the wiliness of Odysseus, the intemperance of AEneas.
I]dleness and intemperance are the principal causes of the gout," said William Buchan, the author of the best-selling eighteenth-century medical manual (357).
Now, it would be contrary to right reason is one were to use up all his goods through intemperance or for no useful purpose.
Pointing out that many Catholics opposed the amendment, Carey notes, "Many Catholic leaders continued to believe that moral persuasion, rather than legislation, was a more effective remedy against the evils of intemperance and alcoholism.
He also showed an early interest in social issues, successfully debating that intemperance caused more misery to humankind than war (Sweeney, 1965).
The American diplomatic strategy, born perhaps of arrogance, intemperance, or a lack of understanding of the value of international approval or acquiescence to the principle of regime change in Iraq, placed the rest of the world on the American time line, which reflected eagerness to gain approval before the onset of summer temperatures in Iraq, which in turn diminish combat effectiveness.
Some states like Indiana experimented with liberal use of fault grounds for divorce including cruelty, desertion, and intemperance.
She also said that visitors were likely to exaggerate the importance of those 'causes' of poverty which originated in the individual (laziness, intemperance, etc.
The history of ancient Rome is the classic example of the descent from virtue into corruption, from the moral restraint of republic to the intemperance of empire.