tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
124) On the other hand, absent the ATS, federal courts had no adequate means to redress claims by aliens for intentional torts committed by U.
Finally, under a general justification defense, whereby the law of torts recognizes privileges under new and changing circumstances, we might see a lawyer in a future annoyancetech intentional tort suit make the following illustrative creative argument--"my client alerted the police on numerous occasions about the loud barking dogs of the plaintiff who sues for trespass to chattels.
As for the second exception, the "district court treated [plaintiffs] claims of misappropriation of trade secrets and breach of a confidential relationship as a claim of interference with contract rights," (336) which the intentional tort exception bars.
Schroeder, Note, Workers' Compensation: Expanding the Intentional Tort Exception to Include Willful, Wanton, and Reckless Employer Misconduct, 58 NOTRE DAME L.
Proximate cause plays a different role in intentional tort cases than it does in negligence cases.
Find out if your Coverage B, or Employer's Liability Policy, covers workers' intentional tort claims and plan accordingly.
Question Two asked whether under Alaska law the policyholder could obtain coverage even when another insured committed an intentional tort in cases when the innocent policyholders were accused of mere negligence by the third party victim.
In addressing the fact that the court refers to "intentional" torts and "negligent" ones, Judge Schwartz qualified the words in quotation marks with the following caveat: "[A]s the authorities uniformly recognize, it is impossible to ascribe either the volition implicit in an intentional tort, the departure from the standard of a `reasonable' person which defines an act of ordinary negligence, or indeed any concept of `fault' at all to one who, like Anicet, is by definition unable to control his own actions through any exercise of reason.
Further, the Court recognized that, "Irvin was acutely aware of the risk of harm to Southern Union, a fact which the jury clearly found in order to find him liable of an intentional tort and award an impressive amount of punitive damages.
Florida's Supreme Court and appellate courts have clearly elucidated this distinction between the intentional tort of common law fraud and deceit, on one hand, and remedies under the FUFTA, on the other.
The court held that for the employer to be liable for an intentional tort, the employee's act must have a "causal nexus to the employee's work.