ransom

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ransom

1) n. money paid to a kidnapper in demand for the release of the person abducted. Ransom money can also be paid to return a valuable object such as a stolen painting. 2) v. to pay money to an abductor to return the person held captive. (See: kidnapping, abduction)

ransom

noun cost of reclamation, cost of recovery, deliverance, extrication, pretium, price of redemption, price of retaking, price of retrieval, redemption, rescue
See also: blackmail, extricate, free, pay, redeem, rescue

RANSOM, contracts, war. An agreement made between the commander of a capturing vessel with the commander of a vanquished vessel, at sea, by which the former permits the latter to depart with his vessel, and gives him a safe conduct, in consideration of a sum of money, which the commander of the vanquished vessel, in his own name, and in the name of the owners of his vessel and cargo, promises to pay at a future time named, to the other.
     2. This contract is usually made in writing in duplicate, one of which is kept by the vanquished vessel which is its safe conduct; and the other by the conquering vessel, which is properly called ransom bill.
     3. This contract, when made in good faith, and not locally prohibited, is valid, and may be enforced. Such contracts have never been prohibited in this country. 1 Kent, Com. 105. In England they are generally forbidden. Chit. Law of Nat. 90 91; Poth. Tr. du Dr. de Propr. n. 127. Vide 2 Bro. Civ. Law, 260; Wesk. 435; 7 Com. Dig. 201; Marsh. Ins. 431; 2 Dall. 15; 15 John. 6; 3 Burr. 1734. The money paid for the redemption of such property is also called the ransom.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Collected Poems of John Crowe Ransom will be published in cooperation with Alfred A.
The Southern Renaissance was in some senses introduced by writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Katherine Anne Porter, and Tennessee Williams, but it became focused in Nashville and Vanderbilt University, where prominent academics or former students such Robert Penn Warren, Donald Davidson, Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom were at work.
The usual suspects counted among the Southern New Critics, the poets and scholars from Vanderbilt known as the Fugitives and their circle of acquaintances, are given their due (for example, John Crowe Ransom, Donald Davidson, Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, et al.
Before they took up the mantle of Agrarianism, John Crowe Ransom, Donald Davidson, and Allen Tate were Fugitive poets who scorned both the romanticism of the Lost Cause and the pragmatism of the New South creed.
14) Unlike John Crowe Ransom, John Dewey was noted for his public support of women's rights during the 1910s and 1920s--although he seldom wrote in detail on women issues--and many contemporary feminists were encouraged by pragmatism's emphasis upon theory's basis in experience, as well as the role of scientific inquiry as a means of improving rather than replicating current social conditions.
Why should so many of the poems of the principal two Southern Fugitives, Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom, poems with titles such as "Pastoral", "Cold pastoral", "Eclogue of the liberal and the poet", "Idyl", and "Eclogue", show the survival of the old pastoral, a formal genre that died out in the seventeenth century?
In this regard, it is worth remembering that John Crowe Ransom, the justly famous editor of Kenyon Review, extended a welcoming hand to Howe early in his career--not only helping him get a post at the Indiana School of Letters, but also printing many of the pieces that would later be collected in Politics and the Novel (1957).
And Allen Tate--who along with John Crowe Ransom would comprise Warren's primary influences among the Fugitive poets--remembers that Warren had covered his dormitory room walls with murals depicting scenes from Eliot's poem (see Cowan 108-09).
Donoghue takes as his theme the plight of the literary imagination after the collapse of myth--the very problem that nagged the principal architects of high modernism: Yeats, Eliot, John Crowe Ransom, and Allen Tate among others.
Richards, John Crowe Ransom, and others--saw reading as an act of uncovering a meaning that was objective and safely implanted in the work.
These included a number recruited after the war by John Crowe Ransom, the founder of the prestigious Kenyon Review.
At the age of 13, the young Hazlitt, living in Wem, wrote to the Shrewsbury Chronicle in protest at the beginning, by a church-and-king mob, of Joseph Priestley's house and laboratory and the Unitarian Chapel in Birmingham, describing Priestley as "one o f the best, one of the wisest, and one of the greatest of men" - illustrating even at that young age a musicality of prose that is kin to the works o say, Allen Ginsberg or John Crowe Ransom.