Judicare

Judicare

To decide or determine in a judicial manner.

In civil and old English Law, judicare means to judge, to pass judgment or sentence, or to decide an issue in an impartial fashion. It refers to the interpretation and application of the laws to the facts and the administration of justice.

References in periodicals archive ?
In my brief (which I never filed, because the parties settled the case), I wanted to use a legal maxim that I had found in Blacks: Cessa regnare, si non vis judicare.
De celso trono poli, pollens clarior sole, age vobis monstrare descendi, vos judicare, Reges et principes sunt subditi sub me viventes.
En este caso, el derecho a que se ejerza justicia se resume en la frase aut dedere aut judicare y en la invocacion de que existe una garantia colectiva que puede ejercerse respecto de los derechos protegidos.
According to Judicare, which is holding the seminar on Saturday, the trouble lay in the fact that the buyers were advised to take the loans out in Swiss Francs rather than Cypriot pounds or Euros.
Qui post completam, susceptae humanitatis dispensationem passus est et mortuus, et resurrexit et ascendit in coelum venturusque est judicare vivos et mortuos (Migne, 1885, pp.
A landmark legal victory by international legal services company Judicare Group cancelled sales agreements and ordered that deposits were repaid, but Mr Land, 55, says he still faces a wait for his money.
128) One example of this is the inclusion in some treaties of dispositions that give effect to the principle of aut dedere aut judicare (extradite or prosecute).
114) Historically, the wrongs alleged in this case, including torture, have triggered the aut dedere aut judicare obligation and therefore touch and concern the United States.
423) In those instruments, States Party undertook the obligation either to extradite the offender found in their territory or "submit the case to its competent authorities for the purpose of prosecution," (424) thus applying the Roman law principle aut dedere aut judicare.
Moreover, any non-self-defensive use of force at sea by a private vessel would qualify as piracy under UNCLOS and/or crimes at sea under the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (SUA), and therefore subject the aggressor ship to universal or aut dedere aut judicare jurisdiction.
This duty has been recognized especially in modern international criminal law treaties and has long been part of customary international law expressed, for example, as the duty aut dedere aut judicare (i.
mandated a study to determine if a judicare model could provide legal