Corpus Juris Civilis

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Corpus Juris Civilis

[Latin, The body of the civil law.] The name given in the early seventeenth century to the collection of Civil Law based upon the compilation and Codification of the Roman system of Jurisprudence directed by the Emperor Justinian I during the years from 528 to 534 a.d.

Corpus Juris Civilis

Justinian's compilation of the Roman law for his empire. It is in four parts: the Institutes (a student introduction); the Digest or Pandects (a collation in four sections of the Roman law from the jurists, which was, however, heavily interpolated by the compilers); the Codex or Code (a compilation of legislative measures); and the Novels (some later supplementary laws). Both the Digest and the Institutes were to form the basis of the later revival of Roman law throughout the continental European world. They are still the object of intense study and debate today.

CORPUS JURIS CIVILIS. The body of the civil law. This, is the name given to a collection of the civil law, consisting of Justinian's Institutes, the Pandects or Digest, the Code, and the Novels.

References in periodicals archive ?
40] Bartolus, whose commentaries on Justinian's Code and Digest formed a central part of the curriculum of the law faculties in the sixteenth century, served as Covarrubias's single most important authority in the doctoral oration.
In this article we consider Justinian's Code, another of the most common law-related monuments teachers will come across in various historical units.
To be sure, Nicholas does not claim that social convention in Ghent was shaped by Roman law; he does, however, go so far as to claim that "It]he custom of Ghent mandated absolutely partible inheritance without regard to sex or age, except in the case of fiefs, and thus was closer to the principles of Justinian's Code than to the customary law of most parts of northern Europe" (Nicholas, Domestic Life, 26).
School curriculums, however, seem most likely to visit the first century BC, and to mention Justinian's Code from the mid-sixth century AD.