juvenile court

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juvenile court

n. a special court or department of a trial court which deals with under-age defendants charged with crimes or who are neglected or out of the control of their parents. The normal age of these defendants is under 18, but juvenile court does not have jurisdiction in cases in which minors are charged as adults. The procedure in juvenile court is not always adversarial (although the minor is entitled to legal representation by a lawyer). It can be an attempt to involve parents or social workers and probation officers in the process to achieve positive results and save the minor from involvement in further crimes. However, serious crimes and repeated offenses can result in sentencing juvenile offenders to prison, with transfer to state prison upon reaching adulthood with limited maximum sentences. Where parental neglect or loss of control is a problem, the juvenile court may seek out foster homes for the juvenile, treating the child as a ward of the court. (See: court)

References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the NACW was formed precisely in time for black women to respond to other women reformers who lobbied for the creation of the first juvenile courts.
Individualized rehabilitation predicated on mentoring is exactly what the founders of the original juvenile courts had in mind.
As the promise of juvenile courts faded in the 1920s, police began to emphasize juvenile crime prevention.
It's long overdue,'' Lancaster Juvenile Court Judge Richard Naranjo said.
Yet, by giving directions for future research, outlining proposals for reforms in the juvenile court, and repeatedly modeling thoughtful, critical policy analysis, the author shows why such misguided responses are no longer acceptable.
CONTACT: James Anderson, Juvenile Court Judges' Commission, +1-717-787-6910.
My answer to the problem is to reform our juvenile courts," he said.
Yet juvenile courts remain the most impenetrable branch of the justice system.
The nation may be faced with the harsh reality that, "In the long run, it will cost more to deal with children in juvenile courts than it ever did in the welfare system.
Once established, juvenile courts developed their own vocabulary.
The juvenile courts (often known as probate courts and more recently as family courts) have varying jurisdictions throughout the country.
2 percent of those who could be located had been officially cataloged as repeat offenders within 10 years of their first appearance in juvenile court.

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