Curia Regis

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Curia Regis

[Latin, The King's Court.]The Anglo-Saxon kings of England regularly summoned the bishops and great men of the kingdom to a council (Witenagemot), which advised the king and occasionally served as a court of justice. Building upon this foundation, the Norman kings after the Conquest in 1066 developed more effective ways of centralizing royal government. By the end of the eleventh century the king was entrusting business to his Curia, a body of officials appointed from the ranks of the highest noblemen, church leaders, and officers of the royal court. With the king, the Curia Regis administered all of the king's business—financial, legislative, and judicial. From the Curia Regis developed the common-law courts, the Chancery, and even the Parliament.

CURIA REGIS. An English court, which assumed this name, during the reign of Henry II. It was Curia or Aula Regis, because it was held in the great hall of the king's palace; and where the king, for some time, administered justice in person. But afterwards, the judicial power was more properly entrusted to the king's judges. The judges who sat in this court were distinguished by the name of justices, or justiciaries. Besides these, the chief justiciary, the stewart of all England, the chancellor, the chamberlain, and the treasurer, also took part in the judicial proceedings of this court.

References in periodicals archive ?
The chamber was made up of judges and privy councillors and grew out of the medieval king's council as a supplement to the regular justice of the common-law courts.
When 14th-century English kings questioned men in the King's Council, Parliament in 1354 and 1368 enacted due process statutes.
The result was that two of the king's council were forced to stand down, were tried and convicted.
The former, the more predominant of the pair both personally and politically, seemed perpetually unsettled and accompanied by controversy; driven by a compulsion to demonstrate his superiority, which he appeared to do with relative ease within his small community (Ogilvie became the Empire's youngest King's Council, in his mid-thirties).
The Tudor King's Council Chamber will be accessible for the first time, enabling visitors to see a unique exhibition of portraits of, and historic objects associated with, Henry's six wives and two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth.
He also presented a memorial to the King's Council urging a search for the Northwest Passage, a water route through North America, thirty to forty years before the great explorers Alexander Mackenzie (1793), Lewis & Clark (1805), Simon Fraser (1808) and David Thompson (1802) followed the rivers to the Pacific.