liberation

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liberation

noun absolution, achievement of liberty, acquittal, acquittance, affranchisement, deliverance, delivery, discharge, disembroiling, disengagement, disenthrallment, dislodgment, dismissal, emancipation, exculpation, exoneration, franchisement, freedom, freeing, liberatio, manumission, pardon, parole, redemption, release, releasing from custody, rescue, separation, unbinding, unfettering, untying, vindication
See also: absolution, acquittal, compurgation, emancipation, exemption, exoneration, freedom, immunity, impunity, parole, probation, release, relief, remission, suffrage

LIBERATION, civil law. This term is synonymous with payment. Dig. 50, 16, 47. It is the extinguishment of a contract by which he who was bound become's free, or liberated. Wolff, Dr. de la Nat. Sec. 749.

References in periodicals archive ?
to a balancing responsibility as under the Directive, the LIBE Proposal
92) The LIBE Proposal also creates substantial ambiguity
The Commission and LIBE Proposals both expand the territorial
infringement" of the Directive, (96) the LIBE Proposal mandates a
When the band exploded nationally, Libes strapped in for a wild ride.
Libes calls 1998 the year of insanity, the year this little ska-swing band from Eugene sold more than 2 million copies of "Zoot Suit Riot.
Libes rode that roller coaster for a while, but he and the band parted ways in May 1999.
He also was inspired by Mike Watt, whom Libes profiled for a piece in the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
Despite the unimaginable losses he suffered, Libes chose not to dwell on the tragedy.
He wished a lot of young kids will watch the movie,'' Libes said.
When Libes reads the three pages - meticulously hand-written for him by his wife - about his experiences as a helmsman for a refugee ship, it is not out of a desire to share his story with others.
Field studies on oysters, however, typically have shown no measurable uptake or very little (Dame & Libes 1993, Wilson-Ormond et al.