lament

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lament

verb bemoan, bewail, commiserate, feel connern for, feel emotions for, feel for, feel remorse for, feel sennitive to, fret, grieve, grieve for, mourn, mourn for, pine, pity, regret, sympathize
See also: deplore, languish, outcry, plaint, regret, repent
References in periodicals archive ?
As one example of this conceptual linkage, some contemporary laments express the notion that the tomb is "a house" constructed on the "seas," as the lamenter cAliya from al-cAiyaiysa sings:
323 BC) and transcribed from the hieroglyphics by Egyptologist Luddeckens in 1943, the lamenter bewails her fate in the same vein, using the house destruction motif as her central theme:
As in the Late Period lament cited earlier, at the death of her husband, the lamenter traditionally would sing "a lament for the self.
described liminal rites as mainly centred on the individual, it must be noted that a significant role in lamenting as a performance is, at least in a funeral or commemoration situation, played by the community as the audience whose presence and existence the lamenter consciously takes into account.
The words gore-goryushka (sorrow) often encountered in the Russian lament vocabulary mark, for the people surrounding the lamenter, an initiatory experience and a greater openness for him/her of the borders between this and the other world, signifying his or her changed status not only for the period of mourning, but for the whole life (Adon'eva 2004, 227 ff.
The abovementioned Onega Vepsian lamenter also made wind-raising sweeping movements over the grave; upon arriving on the grave, she also pronounced the formula, "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" (Welcome, daddy, Jesus has risen, all the deceased have come), as though thereby carrying yet again out the cosmogonic waking act, the specific function of which was to begin communication with the deceased in a customary manner (Vinogradov & Lozanova 1941, 109; also Honko 1974, 29 f.
The "vocabulary" of lament motifs of various peoples is rife with prayers, threats, promises, and flattering--all aiming (or having been aimed, in cases where the more modern lamenter no longer "remembers" it) at gaining control over the comings and goings of the dead.
Thus, a very practical magical combat between the here and the afterworld goes on in laments, a combat in which the lamenter is a kind of gatekeeper and medium.
24) One of the interesting features of laments is that they provide a space to accuse the other of being perverse, sacrilegious, and godless, while at the same time recognizing that the enemy acts friendly toward the lamenter (Ps 55:21), greets (Ps 144:8), and spends time with (Ps 41:5-6) the lamenter.
25) The solace offered to the lamenter by the larger narrative promise of the covenant, the prophet's consoling hope, the sage's confidence, and the psalmist's prayers of trust and gratitude were occasionally called into question and judged as less than fully credible--for example, during the repression at the hands of the forces of the Hellenistic empire.