landlord

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Landlord

A lessor of real property; the owner or possessor of an estate in land or a rental property, who, in an exchange for rent, leases it to another individual known as the tenant.

Cross-references

Landlord and Tenant.

landlord

n. a person who owns real property and rents or leases it to another, called a "tenant." (See: lease, rent, lessor, lessee, tenant)

landlord

noun agrorum possessor, lessor, owner of an estate in land, owner of lands, owner of tenements, propietory owner, proprietor
Associated concepts: ejectment proceeding, landlord's lien
See also: landholder, landowner, lessor, proprietor

landlord

one who grants a lease or tenancy to another, usually in return for a RENT. See LEASE.

LANDLORD. He who rents or leases real estate to another.
     2. He is bound to perform certain duties and is entitled to certain rights, which will here be briefly considered. 1st. His obligations are, 1. To perform all the express covenants into which he has entered in making the lease. 2. To secure to the tenant the quiet enjoyment of the premises leased; but a tenant for years has no remedy against his landlord, if he be ousted by one who has no title, in that case the law leaves him to his remedy against the wrong doer. Y. B. 22 H. VI. 52 b, and 32 H. VI. 32 b; Cro. Eliz. 214; 2 Leon. 104; and see Bac. Ab. Covenant, B. But the implied covenant for quiet enjoyment may be qualified, and enlarged or narrowed according to the particular agreement of the parties; and a general covenant for quiet enjoyment does not extend to wrongful evictions or disturbances by a stranger. Y. B. 26 H. VIII. 3 b. 3. The landlord is bound by his express covenant to repair the premises, but unless he bind himself by express covenant the tenant cannot compel him to repair. 1 Saund. 320; 1 Vent. 26, 44; 1 Sedgw. on Dam. 429; 2 Keb. 505; 1 T. R. 812; 1 Sim. R. 146.
     3. His rights are, 1. To receive the rent agreed upon, and to enforce all the express covenants into which the tenant may have entered. 2. To require the lessee to treat the premises demised in such manner that no injury be done to the inheritance, and prevent waste. 3. To have the possession of the premises after the expiration of the lease. Vide, generally, Com. L. & T., B. 3, c. 1; Woodf. L. & T. ch. 10; 2 Bl. Com. by Chitty, 275, note; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; 1 Supp. to Ves. Jr. 212, 246, 249; 2 Id. 232, 403; Com. Dig. Estate by Grant, G 1; 5 Com. Dig. tit. Nisi Prius Dig. page 553; 8 Com. Dig. 694; Whart. Dig. Landlord & Tenant. As to frauds between landlord and tenant, see Hov. Pr. c. 6, p. 199 to 225.

References in classic literature ?
Finally, she inquired of the landlord what was the value of the carpet in her bedroom, as well as where the said carpet had been manufactured; but, the landlord could do no more than promise to make inquiries.
Mr Codlin sat smiling in the chimney-corner, eyeing the landlord as with a roguish look he held the cover in his hand, and, feigning that his doing so was needful to the welfare of the cookery, suffered the delightful steam to tickle the nostrils of his guest.
The landlord took a step or two towards the door; the stranger fixing his eyes upon him, resumed.
The landlord chuckled again with his lean chuckle, and seemed to be mightily tickled at something beyond my comprehension.
Snell, the landlord, duly put the leading question.
The landlord shouted to them to leave him alone, for he had already told them that he was mad, and as a madman he would not be accountable even if he killed them all.
Jones contented himself however with a negative punishment, and walked off with his new comrades, leaving the guide to the poor revenge of cursing and reviling him; in which latter the landlord joined, saying, "Ay, ay, he is a pure one, I warrant you.
It would turn a man's blood to white wine winegar to hear him tell of it, sir," said the landlord.
The landlord let us do our own cooking and set our table near one of the windows.
Neither the landlord, nor any other person in the public room, noticed any change in him on his return.
The sturdy landlord had a large pair of dull fish-like eyes, and the little man who had hazarded the remark about the moon (and who was the parish-clerk and bell-ringer of Chigwell, a village hard by) had little round black shiny eyes like beads; moreover this little man wore at the knees of his rusty black breeches, and on his rusty black coat, and all down his long flapped waistcoat, little queer buttons like nothing except his eyes; but so like them, that as they twinkled and glistened in the light of the fire, which shone too in his bright shoe-buckles, he seemed all eyes from head to foot, and to be gazing with every one of them at the unknown customer.
Then he took up his cudgel and looked at the landlord as though he would smite him where he stood.